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The Probability of Recession in Poland Based on the Hamilton Switching Model and the Logit Model

  • Milda Maria Burzala


    (Poznan University of Economics)

In the article dating method for the four phases of economic activity is presented. Comparison of probabilities of recession occurrence in Poland based on the Hamilton switching model and the logit model was conducted in the empirical research. The study shows the convergence of indications based both on the proposed dating method and on the Hamilton model. In the presented version the Hamilton model adequately describes the probability of occurrence of two decline phases. The logit model allows to obtain satisfactory results for the division on four phases of economic activity. However, in the domain of the Polish economy, more research is needed in recognising the symptomatic properties of various macroeconomic indicators. The interest rate spread, used successfully in advanced marked economies, continues to alter its characteristics under Polish economic conditions and is currently not the best possible indicator forecasting a recession.

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Article provided by Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika in its journal Dynamic Econometric Models.

Volume (Year): 12 (2012)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 73-88

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Handle: RePEc:cpn:umkdem:v:12:y:2012:p:73-88
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  1. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521766555, April.
  2. Victor Zarnowitz & Ataman Ozyildirim, 2001. "Time Series Decomposition and Measurement of Business Cycles, Trends and Growth Cycles," Economics Program Working Papers 01-03, The Conference Board, Economics Program.
  3. Estrella, Arturo & Hardouvelis, Gikas A, 1991. " The Term Structure as a Predictor of Real Economic Activity," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(2), pages 555-76, June.
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  5. Atta-Mensah, Joseph & Tkacz, Greg, 1998. "Predicting Canadian Recessions Using Financial Variables: A Probit Approach," Staff Working Papers 98-5, Bank of Canada.
  6. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1981. "Qualitative Response Models: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 19(4), pages 1483-1536, December.
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