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Meeting the Millennium Development Goals in Brazil: Can Microeconomic Simulations Help?


  • Francisco H. G. Ferreira


  • Phillippe G. Leite



The authors investigate whether micro-simulation techniques can shed light on the types of policies that should be adopted by countries wishing to meet their Millennium Development Goals. They compare two families of micro-simulations. The first family of micro-simulations decomposes required poverty changes into a change in the mean and a reduction in inequality. Although it highlights the importance of inequality reduction, it appears to be too general to be of much use for policymaking. The second family of micro-simulations is based on a richer model of behavior in the labor markets.It points to the importance of combining different policy options, such as educational expansion and targeted conditional redistribution schemes, to ensure that the poorest people in society are successfully reached. But the absence of market equilibria in these statistical models, as well as the strong stability assumptions which are implicit in their use, argue for extreme caution in their interpretation.

Suggested Citation

  • Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Phillippe G. Leite, 2003. "Meeting the Millennium Development Goals in Brazil: Can Microeconomic Simulations Help?," ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, ECONOMIA JOURNAL OF THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION, vol. 0(Spring 20), pages 235-280, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000425:008681

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Macedo, Roberto, 1985. "Diferenciais de salários entre empresas privadas e estatais no Brasil," Revista Brasileira de Economia - RBE, FGV/EPGE - Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil), vol. 39(4), October.
    2. Ricardo Paes de Barros & Carlos Henrique Corseuil & Gustavo Gonzaga, 1999. "Labor market regulations and the demand for labor in Brazil," Textos para discussão 398, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
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    Cited by:

    1. Leonardo Gasparini & Federico Gutiérrez & Leopoldo Tornarolli, 2007. "Growth And Income Poverty In Latin America And The Caribbean: Evidence From Household Surveys," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 53(2), pages 209-245, June.
    2. Bussolo, Maurizio & Maliszewska, Maryla & Murard, Elie, 2014. "The long-awaited rise of the middle class in Latin America is finally happening," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6912, The World Bank.
    3. Bussolo, Maurizio & De Hoyos, Rafael & Medvedev, Denis, 2009. "Global income distribution and poverty in the absence of agricultural distortions," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4849, The World Bank.
    4. Bussolo, Maurizio & De Hoyos, Rafael E. & Medvedev, Denis & van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique, 2007. "Global growth and distribution : are China and India reshaping the world?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4392, The World Bank.
    5. Bussolo, Maurizio & De Hoyos, Rafael E. & Medvedev, Denis, 2008. "Is the developing world catching up ? global convergence and national rising dispersion," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4733, The World Bank.
    6. World Bank, 2009. "Argentina : Income Support Policies toward the Bicentennial," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13531.
    7. repec:wbk:wbpubs:13530 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    microsimulation techniques; Millenium Development Goals; Brazil;

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation


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