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The voluntary provision of a public good in an international commons

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  • Simon Vicary

Abstract

In a global commons, countries contribute to global welfare by limiting the environmental damage they do. Assuming this to be so, we examine the characteristics of equilibrium without international coordination, with particular focus on how control of damaging emissions relates to country size. There is some association between size and burden-sharing, with larger countries doing more to control emissions, but there remain important differences between this and a conventional `subscription' public good.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Vicary, 2009. "The voluntary provision of a public good in an international commons," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(3), pages 984-996, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:42:y:2009:i:3:p:984-996
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Buchholz, Wolfgang & Konrad, Kai A., 1995. "Strategic transfers and private provision of public goods," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 489-505, July.
    2. Sandler,Todd, 1997. "Global Challenges," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521587495, March.
    3. Warr, Peter G., 1983. "The private provision of a public good is independent of the distribution of income," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 207-211.
    4. Richard Cornes & Roger Hartley, 2007. "Aggregative Public Good Games," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 9(2), pages 201-219, April.
    5. Bergstrom, Theodore & Blume, Lawrence & Varian, Hal, 1986. "On the private provision of public goods," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 25-49, February.
    6. Boadway, Robin & Hayashi, Masayoshi, 1999. "Country size and the voluntary provision of international public goods," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 619-638, November.
    7. Robert H. Haveman, 1973. "Common Property, Congestion, and Environmental Pollution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 87(2), pages 278-287.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Heike Auerswald & Kai A. Konrad & Marcel Thum, 2011. "Adaptation, Mitigation and Risk-Taking in Climate Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 3320, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Richard Cornes & Roger Hartley & Yuji Tamura, 2010. "A New Approach to Solving Production-Appropriation Games with Many Heterogeneous Players," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2010-521, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    3. Chan, Nathan W. & Kotchen, Matthew J., 2014. "A generalized impure public good and linear characteristics model of green consumption," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 1-16.
    4. Bogmans, C.W.J., 2011. "Essays on international trade and the environment," Other publications TiSEM b7453a6c-33b3-49a2-b5cc-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    5. Bogmans, C.W.J., 2011. "Can globalization outweigh free-riding?," Serie Research Memoranda 0048, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    6. Richard Cornes, 2016. "Aggregative Environmental Games," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(2), pages 339-365, February.
    7. Todd Sandler, 2015. "Collective action: fifty years later," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 164(3), pages 195-216, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling

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