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Chapter 3: Austerity: Hurting but Helping


  • Giuseppe Bertola
  • John Driffill
  • Harold James
  • Hans-Werner Sinn
  • Jan-Egbert Sturm
  • Ákos Valentinyi


Chapter 3 analyses the much debated issue of austerity and highlights that fiscal discipline is not only needed to ensure the long-term sustainability of public debt, but also for external rebalancing, which is vital to the long-term sustainability of the euro. Finally,

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  • Giuseppe Bertola & John Driffill & Harold James & Hans-Werner Sinn & Jan-Egbert Sturm & Ákos Valentinyi, 2014. "Chapter 3: Austerity: Hurting but Helping," EEAG Report on the European Economy, CESifo Group Munich, vol. 0, pages 75-90, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:eeagre:v::y:2014:i::p:75-90

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael Graff & Jan-Egbert Sturm, 2010. "The information content of capacity utilisation rates for output gap estimates," KOF Working papers 10-269, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    2. Ran Bi & Haonan Qu & James Roaf, 2013. "Assessing the Impact and Phasing of Multi-year Fiscal Adjustment; A General Framework," IMF Working Papers 13/182, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Òscar Jordà & Alan M. Taylor, 2016. "The Time for Austerity: Estimating the Average Treatment Effect of Fiscal Policy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(590), pages 219-255, February.
    4. Riera-Crichton, Daniel & Vegh, Carlos A. & Vuletin, Guillermo, 2016. "Tax multipliers: Pitfalls in measurement and identification," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 30-48.
    5. Lawrence Christiano & Martin Eichenbaum & Sergio Rebelo, 2011. "When Is the Government Spending Multiplier Large?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(1), pages 78-121.
    6. Alan J. Auerbach & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2012. "Fiscal Multipliers in Recession and Expansion," NBER Chapters,in: Fiscal Policy after the Financial Crisis, pages 63-98 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Valerie A. Ramey, 2011. "Can Government Purchases Stimulate the Economy?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 673-685, September.
    8. Daniel S Kanda, 2011. "Modeling Optimal Fiscal Consolidation Paths in a Selection of European Countries," IMF Working Papers 11/164, International Monetary Fund.
    9. John Bluedorn & Daniel Leigh, 2011. "Revisiting the Twin Deficits Hypothesis: The Effect of Fiscal Consolidation on the Current Account," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 59(4), pages 582-602, November.
    10. Daniel Leigh & Andrea Pescatori & Jaime Guajardo, 2011. "Expansionary Austerity New International Evidence," IMF Working Papers 11/158, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Alesina, Alberto F & Favero, Carlo A. & Giavazzi, Francesco, 2012. "The output effect of fiscal consolidations," CEPR Discussion Papers 9105, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. J. Bradford DeLong & Lawrence H. Summers, 2012. "Fiscal Policy in a Depressed Economy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 43(1 (Spring), pages 233-297.
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