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Sources of Growth in Morocco: An Emperical Analysis in a Regional Perspective

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  • Sekkat Khalid

    (U of Bruxelles)

Abstract

This paper investigates the Moroccan growth experience since 1960 and compares it with the rest of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). While Morocco and the MENA have faced a decreasing growth rate over the period, Moroccan growth was higher and much more volatile. The contribution of labor to growth remained constant over the period, while the contributions of capital and total factor productivity decreased markedly. The growth experience of Morocco was further impacted by the predominance of a rural population and the frequency of drought years. In contrast to the MENA, human capital had a positive impact on growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Sekkat Khalid, 2007. "Sources of Growth in Morocco: An Emperical Analysis in a Regional Perspective," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-17, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:rmeecf:v:2:y:2007:i:1:n:1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ramey, Garey & Ramey, Valerie A, 1995. "Cross-Country Evidence on the Link between Volatility and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1138-1151, December.
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    4. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    5. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    6. Abdelhak Senhadji, 2000. "Sources of Economic Growth: An Extensive Growth Accounting Exercise," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 47(1), pages 1-6.
    7. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew Warner, 1995. "Economic Reform and the Process of Global Integration," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 1-118.
    8. David H. Romer & Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1999. "Does Trade Cause Growth?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 379-399, June.
    9. Nazrul Islam, 1995. "Growth Empirics: A Panel Data Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1127-1170.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lahcen ACHY & Khalid SEKKAT, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Employment in the Moroccan Manufacturing Sector," International Trade 0512011, EconWPA.

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