IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Centrality in Trade Networks and Investment in Security

Listed author(s):
  • Bove Vincenzo

    ()

    (Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick, Social Science Building, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK)

  • Elia Leandro
  • Pelliccia Marco

    (Department of Economics, Birkbeck College, University of London)

The contemporary empirical literature on military spending has focused on institutional and conflict factors, and although has acknowledged the role of trade openness, it has not taken into account the position of a state in the trade network. Building on the concept of network centrality, we claim that the structure of trade networks affects the optimal investment in security, and that a country’s level of military spending is a function of its strategic position in the global network of a critical commodity, such as oil. Our empirical results show that network centrality constrains military spending.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/peps.2016.22.issue-1/peps-2015-0042/peps-2015-0042.xml?format=INT
Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy.

Volume (Year): 22 (2016)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 27-39

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:bpj:pepspp:v:22:y:2016:i:1:p:27-39:n:3
Contact details of provider: Web page: https://www.degruyter.com

Order Information: Web: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/peps

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. Nordhaus, William & Oneal, John R. & Russett, Bruce, 2012. "The Effects of the International Security Environment on National Military Expenditures: A Multicountry Study," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 491-513, July.
  2. J. Paul Dunne & Sam Perlo-Freeman & Ron Smith, 2008. "The Demand For Military Expenditure In Developing Countries: Hostility Versus Capability," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 293-302.
  3. Todd Sandler & James C. Murdoch, 1990. "Nash-Cournot or Lindahl Behavior?: An Empirical Test for the NATO Allies," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(4), pages 875-894.
  4. Vincenzo Bove & Leandro Elia & Petros G. Sekeris, 2014. "US Security Strategy and the Gains from Bilateral Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(5), pages 863-885, November.
  5. Murdoch, James C. & Sandler, Todd, 1984. "Complementarity, free riding, and the military expenditures of NATO allies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1-2), pages 83-101, November.
  6. Vincenzo Bove & Roberto Nisticò, 2014. "Coups d’état and defense spending: a counterfactual analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 161(3), pages 321-344, December.
  7. J Paul Dunne & Ron P. Smith, 2010. "Military Expenditure and Granger Causality: A Critical Review," Working Papers 1007, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  8. Kollias, Christos & Paleologou, Suzanna-Maria, 2013. "Guns, highways and economic growth in the United States," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 449-455.
  9. Raul Caruso & Marco Di Domizio, 2016. "Interdependence between US and European military spending: a panel cointegration analysis (1988-2013)," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(4), pages 302-305, March.
  10. J. Paul Dunne & Ron Smith & Dirk Willenbockel, 2005. "Models Of Military Expenditure And Growth: A Critical Review," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(6), pages 449-461.
  11. Paul Dunne & Sam Perlo-Freeman, 2003. "The Demand for Military Spending in Developing Countries," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 23-48.
  12. Alptekin, Aynur & Levine, Paul, 2012. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A meta-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 636-650.
  13. Han Dorussen & Hugh Ward, 2010. "Trade networks and the Kantian peace," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 47(1), pages 29-42, January.
  14. J. Paul Dunne & Sam Perlo-Freeman, 2003. "The demand for military spending in developing countries: A dynamic panel analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 461-474.
  15. Bove, Vincenzo & Nisticò, Roberto, 2014. "Military in politics and budgetary allocations," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 1065-1078.
  16. J. Paul Dunne & Ron Smith, 2010. "Military Expenditure And Granger Causality: A Critical Review," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(5-6), pages 427-441.
  17. Kim Hyung Min, 2009. "Introducing the New Concept of National Power: From the Network Perspective," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(1), pages 1-15, May.
  18. Colgan, Jeff D., 2014. "The Emperor Has No Clothes: The Limits of OPEC in the Global Oil Market," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 68(03), pages 599-632, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:pepspp:v:22:y:2016:i:1:p:27-39:n:3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.