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A Test of Huntington’s Thesis

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  • Gokmen Gunes

    (Department of Economics, Bocconi University, via Rontgen 1, 20136, Milan, Italy)

Abstract

This paper tests Huntington’s the Clash of Civilizations hypothesis evaluating the impact of civilizations on militarized interstate disputes. In particular, we investigate whether countries that belong to different civilizations tend to be more involved in conflict than countries that belong to the same civilization. We show that over the period of 1816-2001, dissimilarity in civilization in a dyad has no effect on conflict involvement. However, even after controlling for temporal dependence, and for geographic, political, military and economic factors, being part of different civilizations in the post-Cold War period brings about 63.6% higher probability of conflict than belonging to the same civilization, whereas this effect is insignificant during the Cold War.

Suggested Citation

  • Gokmen Gunes, 2012. "A Test of Huntington’s Thesis," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(3), pages 1-9, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:pepspp:v:18:y:2012:i:3:p:1-9:n:10
    DOI: 10.1515/peps-2012-0011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Enrico Spolaore & Romain Wacziarg, 2016. "War and Relatedness," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(5), pages 925-939, December.
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