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Explaining Regulatory Preferences: CSR, Soft Law, or Hard Law? Insights from a Survey of Nordic Pioneers in CSR

Listed author(s):
  • Gjølberg Maria

    (University of Oslo)

Registered author(s):

    Business is often assumed to resist increased social and environmental regulation, preferring voluntary or soft-law approaches to global governance. This article analyzes the dynamics between CSR, soft law, and hard law by exploring corporate attitudes in the Nordic area towards CSR and regulationan area reputed to be a forerunner in both CSR and social and environmental regulation. The analysis, based on a survey of the Nordic companies with the strongest CSR performance, reveals skepticism towards relying on CSR and voluntary approaches, combined with a very strong preference for increased international regulation of social and environmental issues. Drawing on insights from recent analyses in the governance literature, the article discusses the conditions under which business favors increased social and environmental regulation, concluding that corporate self-interest and increased international regulation can indeed coincide.

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    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/bap.2011.13.2/bap.2011.13.2.1351/bap.2011.13.2.1351.xml?format=INT
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    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Business and Politics.

    Volume (Year): 13 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (August)
    Pages: 1-33

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    Handle: RePEc:bpj:buspol:v:13:y:2011:i:2:n:4
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    1. Richard A. Posner, 1974. "Theories of Economic Regulation," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 5(2), pages 335-358, Autumn.
    2. Michael C. Jensen, 2001. "Value Maximization, Stakeholder Theory, And The Corporate Objective Function," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 14(3), pages 8-21.
    3. Mayer Frederick & Gereffi Gary, 2010. "Regulation and Economic Globalization: Prospects and Limits of Private Governance," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(3), pages 1-27, October.
    4. Nick Johnstone & Pascale Scapecchi & Bjarne Ytterhus & Rolf Wolff, 2004. "The firm, environmental management and environmental measures: Lessons from a survey of European manufacturing firms," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(5), pages 685-707.
    5. Jon Birger Skjærseth & Olav Schram Stokke & Jørgen Wettestad, 2006. "Soft Law, Hard Law, and Effective Implementation of International Environmental Norms," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 6(3), pages 104-120, 08.
    6. Irja Vormedal, 2008. "The Influence of Business and Industry NGOs in the Negotiation of the Kyoto Mechanisms: the Case of Carbon Capture and Storage in the CDM," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 8(4), pages 36-65, November.
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