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Divested Interests: Globalization and the New Politics of Exchange Rates

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  • Cleeland Knight Sarah

    (American University)

Abstract

The globalization of production and finance is responsible for much of the variation in political contestation over exchange rates since the end of Bretton Woods. On the one hand, globalization increases the salience of the policy decisions that affect exchange rates, as more firms and their workers engage more in international trade and compete more against imports. On the other hand, globalization offers firms a myriad of opportunities to manage their exchange rate risk, through operational and financial hedging. But hedging is available to only certain types of economic actors and in certain situations of exchange rate risk. In this way, globalization has redrawn traditional political cleavages on exchange rates. This argument is tested with an original survey of US firms, labor unions, and trade associations on their preferences and political activity on exchange rate policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Cleeland Knight Sarah, 2010. "Divested Interests: Globalization and the New Politics of Exchange Rates," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(2), pages 1-30, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:buspol:v:12:y:2010:i:2:n:3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. I. M. Destler, 2005. "American Trade Politics 4th Edition," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 3829.
    2. Frieden, Jeffry A., 2002. "Real Sources of European Currency Policy: Sectoral Interests and European Monetary Integration," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(04), pages 831-860, September.
    3. Bartram, Söhnke M., 2008. "What lies beneath: Foreign exchange rate exposure, hedging and cash flows," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1508-1521, August.
    4. J Lawrence Broz & Jeffry Frieden & Stephen Weymouth, 2008. "Exchange Rate Policy Attitudes: Direct Evidence from Survey Data," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 55(3), pages 417-444, July.
    5. Choi, Jongmoo Jay & Jiang, Cao, 2009. "Does multinationality matter? Implications of operational hedging for the exchange risk exposure," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(11), pages 1973-1982, November.
    6. George Allayannis & Jane Ihrig & James P. Weston, 2001. "Exchange-Rate Hedging: Financial versus Operational Strategies," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 391-395.
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