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Great Spending Crashes

Author

Listed:
  • Beckworth David

    () (Western Kentucky University)

  • Hendrickson Josh

    () (University of Mississippi)

Abstract

Over the last century, there have been four major peacetime crashes in aggregate nominal spending in the United States. We argue in this paper that these great spending crashes can be best understood from a monetary disequilibrium perspective. We examine this hypothesis using a structural vector autoregression that identifies the key monetary shocks implied by the monetary disequilibrium view. We find that these monetary shocks are the main contributors to each of the great spending crashes.

Suggested Citation

  • Beckworth David & Hendrickson Josh, 2012. "Great Spending Crashes," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-28, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:12:y:2012:i:1:n:28
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jordi GalĂ­, 1992. "How Well Does The IS-LM Model Fit Postwar U. S. Data?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 709-738.
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    4. Christina D. Romer, 1990. "The Great Crash and the Onset of the Great Depression," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(3), pages 597-624.
    5. Lawrence J. Christiano & Roberto Motto & Massimo Rostagno, 2003. "The Great Depression and the Friedman-Schwartz hypothesis," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, pages 1119-1215.
    6. John R. Walter, 2005. "Depression era bank failures : the great contagion of the great shakedown?," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 39-54.
    7. Bordo, Michael D. & Choudhri, Ehsan U. & Schwartz, Anna J., 2002. "Was Expansionary Monetary Policy Feasible during the Great Contraction? An Examination of the Gold Standard Constraint," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 1-28, January.
    8. Peel, David A & Taylor, Mark P, 2002. "Covered Interest Rate Arbitrage in the Interwar Period and the Keynes-Einzig Conjecture," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 34(1), pages 51-75, February.
    9. Keating, John W., 1996. "Structural information in recursive VAR orderings," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(9-10), pages 1557-1580.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Some Thoughts on Liquidity
      by Josh in The Everyday Economist on 2013-05-24 00:31:52

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