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Corruption, Environmental Resources, and International Trade


  • Ranjan Priya

    () (University of California, Irvine)

  • Bakshi Baishali

    () (


It is shown how corruption in the management of environmental resources can give rise to a comparative advantage in environment-intensive industries. International trade, in this setting, is not necessarily welfare improving. When corruption responds endogenously to the over-exploitation of resources, it is possible for international trade to generate forces that improve resource management by reducing corruption. Therefore, in this case trade could provide gains in addition to the usual gains.

Suggested Citation

  • Ranjan Priya & Bakshi Baishali, 2006. "Corruption, Environmental Resources, and International Trade," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-30, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:topics.6:y:2006:i:1:n:17

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