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A Calculator for Energy Consumption Changes Arising from New Technologies

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  • Saunders Harry D

    () (Decision Processes Incorporated)

Abstract

This article offers a simple, easy-to-use tool, CECANT, that allows policy analysts to calculate the economy-wide or sectoral energy use effects of new or prospective energy efficiency technologies. Such effects are in general intricate and subtle. Unlike more complex general equilibrium models, the tool requires only that the researcher has access to econometric estimates of the economy’s (or sector’s) cost function. CECANT enables analysts to rapidly address key policy questions related to reducing carbon emissions, such as setting R&D priorities, managing the deployment of different technologies in different sectors, and comparing technology effectiveness across countries. A user-friendly software implementation accompanies this article, and examples are given showing its use.

Suggested Citation

  • Saunders Harry D, 2005. "A Calculator for Energy Consumption Changes Arising from New Technologies," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-35, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:topics.5:y:2005:i:1:n:15
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yang, Lisha & Li, Jianglong, 2017. "Rebound effect in China: Evidence from the power generation sector," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 53-62.
    2. Wang, Zhaohua & Lu, Milin, 2014. "An empirical study of direct rebound effect for road freight transport in China," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 274-281.
    3. repec:eee:eneeco:v:67:y:2017:i:c:p:202-212 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Wang, Zhaohua & Lu, Milin & Wang, Jian-Cai, 2014. "Direct rebound effect on urban residential electricity use: An empirical study in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 124-132.
    5. Wei, Taoyuan, 2010. "A general equilibrium view of global rebound effects," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 661-672, May.
    6. Magee, Christopher L. & Devezas, Tessaleno C., 2017. "A simple extension of dematerialization theory: Incorporation of technical progress and the rebound effect," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 196-205.
    7. Saunders, Harry D., 2014. "Toward a neoclassical theory of sustainable consumption: Eight golden age propositions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 220-232.
    8. Edwards, Erwin Elliot & Iyare, O.S. & Moseley, L.L., 2012. "Energy consumption in typical Caribbean office buildings: A potential short term solution to energy concerns," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 154-161.
    9. Font Vivanco, David & Kemp, René & van der Voet, Ester, 2016. "How to deal with the rebound effect? A policy-oriented approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 114-125.
    10. Font Vivanco, David & McDowall, Will & Freire-González, Jaume & Kemp, René & van der Voet, Ester, 2016. "The foundations of the environmental rebound effect and its contribution towards a general framework," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 125(C), pages 60-69.
    11. Sorrell, Steve, 2009. "Jevons' Paradox revisited: The evidence for backfire from improved energy efficiency," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1456-1469, April.
    12. Saunders, Harry D., 2008. "Fuel conserving (and using) production functions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2184-2235, September.

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