IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bpj/bejeap/v15y2015i1p32n10.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Fostering Household Formation: Evidence from a Spanish Rental Subsidy

Author

Listed:
  • Aparicio-Fenoll Ainhoa

    () (Collegio Carlo Alberto, Turin, Italy)

  • Oppedisano Veruska

    ()

Abstract

In Southern Europe youngsters leave their parental home significantly later than in Northern Europe and the United States. In this paper, we study the effect of a monthly cash subsidy on the probability that young adults live apart from parents and childbearing. The subsidy, introduced in Spain in 2008, is conditional on young adults renting accommodation, and it amounts to almost 20% of the average youngsters’ wage. Our identification strategy exploits the subsidy eligibility age threshold to assess the causal impact of the cash transfer. Difference-in-Differences estimates show positive effects of the policy on the probability of living apart from parents, living with a romantic partner, and childbearing for 22 year-olds compared to 21 year-olds. Results persist when the sample is expanded to include wider age ranges. The effect is larger among young adults earning lower incomes and living in high rental price areas. This is consistent with the hypothesis that youngsters delay household formation because the cost is too high relative to their income.

Suggested Citation

  • Aparicio-Fenoll Ainhoa & Oppedisano Veruska, 2015. "Fostering Household Formation: Evidence from a Spanish Rental Subsidy," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(1), pages 1-32, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:15:y:2015:i:1:p:32:n:10
    DOI: 10.1515/bejeap-2014-0003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1515/bejeap-2014-0003
    Download Restriction: For access to full text, subscription to the journal or payment for the individual article is required.
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gianna Claudia Giannelli & Chiara Monfardini, 2003. "Joint decisions on household membership and human capital accumulation of youths. The role of expected earnings and local markets," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 265-285, May.
    2. Nuno Martins & Ernesto Villanueva, 2009. "Does High Cost of Mortgage Debt Explain Why Young Adults Live with Their Parents?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(5), pages 974-1010, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Enrica Di Stefano, 2019. "Leaving your mamma: why so late in Italy?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 323-347, March.
    2. Dirección General de Economía y Estadística, 2020. "El mercado de la vivienda en España entre 2014 y 2019," Occasional Papers 2013, Banco de España;Occasional Papers Homepage.
    3. Namkee Ahn & Virginia Sánchez-Marcos, 2017. "Emancipation under the great recession in Spain," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 477-495, June.
    4. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Cristina Borra, 2018. "Internal Mobility after the Expansion of the Welfare State: Evidence from Spain," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1806, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    5. Enrica Di Stefano, 2017. "Leaving your mamma: why so late in Italy?," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1144, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Aparicio Fenoll, Ainoa & Oppedisano, Veruska, 2012. "Fostering the Emancipation of Young People: Evidence from a Spanish Rental Subsidy," IZA Discussion Papers 6651, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Namkee Ahn & Virginia Sánchez-Marcos, 2017. "Emancipation under the great recession in Spain," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 477-495, June.
    3. Francesca Modena & Concetta Rondinelli, 2011. "Leaving home and housing prices. The experience of Italian youth emancipation," Department of Economics Working Papers 1101, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.
    4. Antonia Díaz & M. Dolores Guilló, 2005. "Family ties and labor supply," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 29(2), pages 289-329, May.
    5. Fabrizio Pompei & Ekaterina Selezneva, 2015. "Education Mismatch, Human Capital and Labour Status of Young People across European Union Countries," Working Papers 347, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).
    6. Emma Tominey, 2010. "The Timing of Parental Income and Child Outcomes: The Role of Permanent and Transitory Shocks," CEE Discussion Papers 0120, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    7. Fernanda Mazzotta & Lavinia Parisi, 2015. "The effect of Employment on Leaving Home in Italy," Discussion Papers 8_2015, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    8. Flannery, Darragh & O’Donoghue, Cathal, 2013. "The demand for higher education: A static structural approach accounting for individual heterogeneity and nesting patterns," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 243-257.
    9. Neil Bhutta & Daniel R. Ringo, 2017. "The Effect of Interest Rates on Home Buying : Evidence from a Discontinuity in Mortgage Insurance Premiums," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-086, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    10. Christopoulou, Rebekka & Pantalidou, Maria, 2017. "The parental home as labor market insurance for young Greeks during the crisis," GLO Discussion Paper Series 158, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    11. David C. Ribar, 2015. "Is Leaving Home a Hardship?," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 81(3), pages 598-618, January.
    12. Sievertsen, Hans Henrik, 2016. "Local unemployment and the timing of post-secondary schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 17-28.
    13. Davia, Maria A., 2004. "Tackling multiple choices: a joint determination of transitions out of education and into the labour market across the European Union," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-22, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    14. Victoria Prowse, 2012. "Modeling Employment Dynamics With State Dependence and Unobserved Heterogeneity," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 411-431, April.
    15. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A., 2008. "Leaving Home: What Economics Has to Say about the Living Arrangements of Young Australians," IZA Discussion Papers 3309, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    16. Maria Chiuri & Daniela Del Boca, 2010. "Home-leaving decisions of daughters and sons," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 393-408, September.
    17. Aina, Carmen & Baici, Eliana & Casalone, Giorgia & Pastore, Francesco, 2019. "Delayed Graduation and University Dropout: A Review of Theoretical Approaches," IZA Discussion Papers 12601, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. MAZZOTTA, Fernanda & PARISI, Lavinia, 2017. "What are the Role of Economic Factors in Determining Leaving and Returning to the Parental Home in Europe During the Crisis? Technical Details," CELPE Discussion Papers 151, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
    19. Ana Ferrer & Jeremy Clark, 2016. "The Effect of Housing Price Changes on Fertility: Evidence from Canada," Working Papers 1603, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2016.
    20. Laura Cavalli & Alessandro Bucciol & Paolo Pertile & Veronica Polin & Nicola Sartor & Alessandro Sommacal, 2012. "Modelling life-course decisions for the analysis of interpersonal and intrapersonal redistribution," Working Papers 25/2012, University of Verona, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:15:y:2015:i:1:p:32:n:10. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Golla). General contact details of provider: https://www.degruyter.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.