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Global Economy and Gender Inequalities: The Case of the Urban Chinese Labor Market

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  • Xiaoling Shu
  • Yifei Zhu
  • Zhanxin Zhang

Abstract

This article examines the effects of economic globalization on gender inequalities in urban China. It argues that the significance of economic globalization on gender inequality depends on its impact on job queues in the labor market of a country. Copyright (c) 2007 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaoling Shu & Yifei Zhu & Zhanxin Zhang, 2007. "Global Economy and Gender Inequalities: The Case of the Urban Chinese Labor Market," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1307-1332.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:88:y:2007:i:5:p:1307-1332
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anne O. Krueger, 1983. "Trade and Employment in Developing Countries, Volume 3: Synthesis and Conclusions," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number krue83-1, April.
    2. Anne O. Krueger, 1983. "Trade and Employment in Less Developed Countries: The Questions," NBER Chapters,in: Trade and Employment in Developing Countries, Volume 3: Synthesis and Conclusions, pages 1-9 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Do Chinese women get half the credit for holding up half the sky?
      by Jane Golley in East Asia Forum on 2018-03-07 23:00:46

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Qian Forrest & Pan, Zi, 2012. "Women’s Entry into Self-employment in Urban China: The Role of Family in Creating Gendered Mobility Patterns," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1201-1212.
    2. Yingru Li & Yehua Dennis Wei, 2014. "Multidimensional Inequalities in Health Care Distribution in Provincial China: A Case Study of Henan Province," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 105(1), pages 91-106, February.

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