IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/scotjp/v52y2005i2p194-221.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Genetic Endowments, Parental And Child Health In Rural Ethiopia

Author

Listed:
  • Bereket Kebede

Abstract

The determinants of long-term child health in Ethiopia - as measured by height-for-age "z"-scores - are examined controlling for community, household and individual level heterogeneity. The influence of parental health and the role of genetics are analysed. The height of parents is highly significant but no significant correlation with per capita expenditures is found. Food prices, birth order, sex and age of children, number of siblings of the mother, years of marriage and altitude are important determinants. Deprivations in later years are more important than during pre- or neo-natal periods. Genetic inheritance seems to explain the correlations between child and parental health. Copyright (c) Scottish Economic Society 2005.

Suggested Citation

  • Bereket Kebede, 2005. "Genetic Endowments, Parental And Child Health In Rural Ethiopia," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 52(2), pages 194-221, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:2:p:194-221
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.0036-9292.2005.00341.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bauer, Thomas & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1999. "Overtime Work and Overtime Compensation in Germany," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, pages 419-436.
    2. Jennifer Hunt, 1999. "Has Work-Sharing Worked in Germany?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 117-148.
    3. Kapteyn, Arie & Kalwij, Adriaan & Zaidi, Asghar, 2004. "The myth of worksharing," Labour Economics, Elsevier, pages 293-313.
    4. Leslie, Derek, 1991. "Modelling Hours of Work in a Labour Services Function," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 38(1), pages 19-31, February.
    5. Bruno Crepon & Francis Kramarz, 2002. "Employed 40 Hours or Not Employed 39: Lessons from the 1982 Mandatory Reduction of the Workweek," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, pages 1355-1389.
    6. Hubler, Olaf, 1989. "Individual overtime functions with double correction for selectivity bias," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 87-90.
    7. Kalwig, A.S. & Gregory, M., 2000. "Overtime Hours in Great Britain Over the Period 1975-1999: A panel Data Analysis," Economics Series Working Papers 9927, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Tor Jacobson & Henry Ohlsson, 2000. "Working time, employment, and work sharing: Evidence from Sweden," Empirical Economics, Springer, pages 169-187.
    9. Schmidt-Sorensen, Jan Beyer, 1991. "An Efficiency-Wage-Hours Model and Shorter Working Hours," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 38(2), pages 113-131, May.
    10. Calmfors, Lars & Hoel, Michael, 1988. " Work Sharing and Overtime," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 90(1), pages 45-62.
    11. Andrews, M J & Simmons, R, 2001. "Friday May Never Be the Same Again: Some Results on Work-Sharing from Union-Firm Bargaining Models," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(5), pages 488-516, November.
    12. Jennifer Hunt, 1998. "Hours Reductions as Work-Sharing," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, pages 339-381.
    13. Brunello, Giorgio, 1989. "The Employment Effects of Shorter Working Hours: An Application to Japanese Data," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 56(224), pages 473-486, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Sonia Bhalotra & Samantha Rawlings, 2013. "Gradients of the Intergenerational Transmission of Health in Developing Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 660-672.
    2. Coneus, Katja & Spiess, C. Katharina, 2012. "The intergenerational transmission of health in early childhood—Evidence from the German Socio-Economic Panel Study," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 89-97.
    3. Gregory Ponthiere, 2011. "Mortality, Family and Lifestyles," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 175-190, June.
    4. Coneus, Katja & Spieß, Christa Katharina, 2008. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Health in Early Childhood," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-073, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:52:y:2005:i:2:p:194-221. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sesssea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.