IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

A Reexamination of the Time Path of Wage Differentials in Taiwan


  • Chun-Hung A. Lin
  • Peter F. Orazem


Contrary to the conclusions of a recent paper by Chen and Hsu (Review of Development Economics, vol. 5, 2001, pp. 336-54), wage inequality and returns to college-educated workers have risen in Taiwan since 1980. Government policies which have caused rapid expansion of the supply of new college graduates have depressed returns for only the youngest cohorts of college graduates. Older cohorts of college graduates experienced rising returns, as have college graduates as a whole. Young college-educated women's returns fell more and older college-educated women's returns rose more relative to their male counterparts. Consequently, the rising share of women in the labor force helped amplify these trends. Changing trade patterns have tended to increase labor demand in sectors that use educated labor more intensively, helping to raise returns to skill. However, in contrast to western economies, rising capital intensity does not appear to have accelerated the pay gap by skill in Taiwan. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2004..

Suggested Citation

  • Chun-Hung A. Lin & Peter F. Orazem, 2004. "A Reexamination of the Time Path of Wage Differentials in Taiwan," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(2), pages 295-308, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:8:y:2004:i:2:p:295-308

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gramlich, Edward M, 1994. "Infrastructure Investment: A Review Essay," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 1176-1196, September.
    2. Feltenstein, Andrew & Ha, Jiming, 1995. "The Role of Infrastructure in Mexican Economic Reform," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 9(2), pages 287-304, May.
    3. Morrison, Catherine J & Schwartz, Amy Ellen, 1996. "State Infrastructure and Productive Performance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1095-1111, December.
    4. J. M. Albala-Bertrand, 1999. "Industrial Interdependence Change in Chile: 1960-90 a comparison with Taiwan and South Korea," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 161-191.
    5. E. C. Mamatzakis, 1999. "Testing for long run relationship between infrastructure and private capital productivity: a time series analysis for the Greek industry," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(4), pages 243-246.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Yana van der Meulen Rodgers & Joseph Zveglich & Laura Wherry, 2006. "Gender Differences In Vocational School Training And Earnings Premiums In Taiwan," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 527-560.
    2. Keng, Shao-Hsun & Orazem, Peter F., 2017. "Performance Pay, the Marriage Market and Rising Income Inequality in Taiwan," ISU General Staff Papers 201702050800001023, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Yang, Sheng-Ping & DeBeaumont, Ronald, 2010. "Pay as incentive or pay as reward? The case of Taiwan," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 76-86, February.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:8:y:2004:i:2:p:295-308. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.