IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/popdev/v31y2005i3p447-471.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Restructuring of the US Meat Processing Industry and New Hispanic Migrant Destinations

Author

Listed:
  • William Kandel
  • Emilio A. Parrado

Abstract

Findings from the 2000 US Census indicate high rates of Hispanic population increase beyond urban areas and traditional immigrant-receiving states. The diversity of new destinations raises questions about forces attracting migrants to rural areas and links between economic structural change and Hispanic population growth. Our conceptual framework applies dual labor market theory to the meat processing industry, a sector whose growing Hispanic labor force offers an illustrative case study for analyzing how labor demand influences demographic change. We document the industry's consolidation, concentration, increased demand for low-skilled labor, and changing labor force composition over three decades. We then position meat processing within a broader analysis that models nonmetropolitan county Hispanic population growth between 1980 and 2000 as a function of changes in industrial sector employment share and nonmetro county economic and demographic indicators. We find that growth in meat processing employment exhibits the largest positive coefficient increase in nonmetro Hispanic population growth over two decades and the largest impact of all sectors by 2000. Copyright 2005 The Population Council, Inc..

Suggested Citation

  • William Kandel & Emilio A. Parrado, 2005. "Restructuring of the US Meat Processing Industry and New Hispanic Migrant Destinations," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 31(3), pages 447-471.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:31:y:2005:i:3:p:447-471
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1728-4457.2005.00079.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard B. Freeman, 1994. "Working Under Different Rules," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number free94-1, April.
    2. Putnam, Judith Jones & Allshouse, Jane E., 1997. "Food Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures, 1970-95," Statistical Bulletin 154919, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Shaun A. Golding & Katherine J. Curtis, 2013. "Migration and rural development: resettlement, remittances and amenities," Chapters,in: Handbook of Rural Development, chapter 6, pages i-ii Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Danielle Christine Rhubart, 2017. "Identifying Associations Between State Medicaid Expansion Decisions and Spatial Disparities in County Insurance Rate Changes Under the Affordable Care Act," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(1), pages 109-135, February.
    3. Richard Turner, 2014. "Occupational Stratification of Hispanics, Whites, and Blacks in Southern Rural Destinations: A Quantitative Analysis," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(5), pages 717-746, October.
    4. Uzi Rebhun & David L. Brown, 2015. "Patterns and selectivities of urban/rural migration in Israel," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(5), pages 113-144, July.
    5. Blake Sisk & Carl Bankston, 2014. "Hurricane Katrina, a Construction Boom, and a New Labor Force: Latino Immigrants and the New Orleans Construction Industry, 2000 and 2006–2010," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(3), pages 309-334, June.
    6. Joshua Sbicca, 2015. "Food labor, economic inequality, and the imperfect politics of process in the alternative food movement," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 32(4), pages 675-687, December.
    7. Philip Kreager, 2008. "Aristotle and Open Population Thinking," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 34(4), pages 599-629.
    8. Kenneth M. Johnson & Daniel T. Lichter, 2016. "Diverging Demography: Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Contributions to U.S. Population Redistribution and Diversity," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(5), pages 705-725, October.
    9. Kao-Lee Liaw & William Frey, 2008. "Choices of Metropolitan Destinations by the 1995-2000 New Immigrants Born in Mexico and India: Characterization and Multivariate Explanation," Working Papers 08-27, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    10. Kenneth M. Johnson & Daniel T. Lichter, 2010. "Growing Diversity among America's Children and Youth: Spatial and Temporal Dimensions," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 36(1), pages 151-176.
    11. Stephanie Potochnick, 2014. "The Academic Adaptation of Children of Immigrants in New and Established Settlement States: The Role of Family, Schools, and Neighborhoods," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 33(3), pages 335-364, June.
    12. Ornelas, India J. & Perreira, Krista M., 2011. "The role of migration in the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents in the USA," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(8), pages 1169-1177.
    13. Lei Xu, 2007. "Inter-CMA Migration of the Immigrants in Canada: 1991-1996 and 1996-2001," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 195, McMaster University.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:31:y:2005:i:3:p:447-471. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0098-7921 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.