IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Foreign Direct Investment, Technology Sourcing and Reverse Spillovers


  • Nigel Driffield
  • James H. Love


Recent theoretical work points to the possibility of foreign direct investment motivated not by 'ownership' advantages which may be exploited by a multinational enterprise but by the desire to access the superior technology of a host nation through direct investment. To be successful, technology sourcing foreign direct investment hinges crucially on the existence of domestic-to-foreign technological externalities within the host country. We test empirically for the existence of such 'reverse spillover' effects for a panel of UK manufacturing industries. The results demonstrate that technology generated by the domestic sector spills over to foreign multinational enterprises, but that this effect is restricted to relatively research and development intensive sectors. There is also evidence that these spillover effects are affected by the spatial concentration of industry, and that learning-by-doing effects are restricted to sectors in which technology sourcing is unlikely to be a motivating influence. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The Victoria University of Manchester, 2003.

Suggested Citation

  • Nigel Driffield & James H. Love, 2003. "Foreign Direct Investment, Technology Sourcing and Reverse Spillovers," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 71(6), pages 659-672, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:71:y:2003:i:6:p:659-672

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Liu, Zheng & Pappa, Evi, 2008. "Gains from international monetary policy coordination: Does it pay to be different?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 2085-2117, July.
    2. Eric Thode & Norbert Berthold & Rainer Fehn, 1999. "Real Wage Rigidities, Fiscal Policy, and the Stability of EMU in the Transition Phase," IMF Working Papers 99/83, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:71:y:2003:i:6:p:659-672. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.