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Legislative Pay and Legislator Quality

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  • Franklin G. Mixon Jr
  • Sean P. Salter

Abstract

This study extends previous work by Mixon and Wilkinson (1999, Public Finance Review 27: 418-433) and Palia (2000, RAND Journal of Economics 31: 165-179) suggesting that formal human capital attainment is lower in political and managerial roles wherein expected compensation is less. The present study constructs a cumulative probability distribution function for years of education attained for both branches of the 109th US Congress and finds that the distribution of years of education attainment in the US Senate second-order dominates that in the US House due to differences in the expected compensation levels favoring the former congressional branch. The stochastic dominance test results are supported by findings of significant differences in education attainment (favoring senators) at different quantiles of the joint education attainment distribution. Finally, goodness-of-fit tests also indicate that the distribution of education attainment quality in the US Senate, as measured by various academic institution quality indicators, is significantly different from that in the US House, again owing to the differences in expected compensation. Copyright 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation 2008 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • Franklin G. Mixon Jr & Sean P. Salter, 2008. "Legislative Pay and Legislator Quality," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(4), pages 679-695, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:22:y:2008:i:4:p:679-695
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker & Casey B. Mulligan, 1997. "The Endogenous Determination of Time Preference," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 729-758.
    2. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters,in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Judith Chevalier & Glenn Ellison, 1999. "Are Some Mutual Fund Managers Better Than Others? Cross-Sectional Patterns in Behavior and Performance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 54(3), pages 875-899, June.
    4. repec:bin:bpeajo:v:24:y:1993:i:1993-1m:p:1-72 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Franklin G. Mixon Jr. & James B. Wilkinson, 1999. "Compensation Schemes and Human Capital Attainment in Congress: Is There an Adverse Selection of Legislator Attributes?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 27(4), pages 418-433, July.
    6. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, June.
    7. Darius Palia, 2000. "The Impact of Regulation on CEO Labor Markets," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 31(1), pages 165-179, Spring.
    8. Theodore W. Schultz, 1962. "Reflections on Investment in Man," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 1-1.
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Cebula & Franklin Mixon, 2012. "Dodging the vote?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 325-343, February.
    2. Richard Cebula & Franklin Mixon & Mark Montez, 2015. "Teachers’ salaries and human capital, and their effects on academic performance: an institution-level analysis of Los Angeles County high schools," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(2), pages 347-356, April.

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