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UK Wage Inequality: An Industry and Regional Perspective

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  • Karl Taylor

Abstract

This paper looks at male wage inequality in the UK across industries and regions over a 15 year period. After controlling for the heterogeneity of productivity characteristics across the population, that part of wage inequality which cannot be explained by observable worker characteristics is examined. This is undertaken at both the industry and regional level to assess the key themes dominant in the literature capable of explaining within-group wage inequality, namely: technology; globalization; female participation; immigration; shifts in the supply of relative education across cohorts; and falling unionization. Copyright 2006 The Author; Journal compilation 2006 CEIS, Fondazione Giacomo Brodolini and Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

Suggested Citation

  • Karl Taylor, 2006. "UK Wage Inequality: An Industry and Regional Perspective," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 20(1), pages 91-124, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:20:y:2006:i:1:p:91-124
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-9914.2006.00335.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Francesco Caselli & Wilbur John Coleman, 2001. "Cross-Country Technology Diffusion: The Case of Computers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 328-335, May.
    2. Richard B. Freeman & Lawrence F. Katz, 1995. "Differences and Changes in Wage Structures," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number free95-1, January.
    3. Freeman, Richard B. & Katz, Lawrence F. (ed.), 1995. "Differences and Changes in Wage Structures," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226261607.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chris Milner & Juliane Scheffel & Feicheng Wang, 2016. "Globalisation and Inter-Industry Wage Differentials in China," Discussion Papers 2016-02, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    2. Massimiliano Calì, 2012. "Trade Liberalisation Does Not Always Raise Wage Premia: Evidence from Ugandan Districts," SERC Discussion Papers 0114, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    3. Joao Pereira & Aurora Galego, 2013. "Intra-Regional Regional Wage Inequality In Portugal: A Quantile Based Decomposition Analisys," ERSA conference papers ersa13p158, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Gibbons, Stephen & Overman, Henry G. & Pelkonen, Panu, 2010. "Wage disparities in Britain: people or place?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 30845, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Nicolas Fleury & Fabrice Gilles, 2012. "MOBILITES INTERGENERATIONNELLES DE CAPITAL HUMAIN ET RESTRUCTURATIONS INDUSTRIELLES. UNE EVALUATION POUR LE CAS DE LA France, 1946-1999," Working Papers hal-00988949, HAL.

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