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Cost and Benefits of Merger Control: An Applied Game Theoretic Perspective -super-


  • Bas Postema
  • Marie Goppelsroeder
  • Peter AG Bergeijk


This paper discusses how simulation models based on game-theoretic foundations can be used to arrive at an estimate of the net benefits of the merger control legislation. We illustrate our method using the Dutch new merger control legislation that was introduced in 1998. We analyse the effects of proposed mergers in four markets where 26 firms are operating and use a sample period of 5 years. Based on the results of these cases and using a cost benefit analysis, we estimate the net benefits of Dutch merger control at about a little more than €100 million a year during the first five years of merger control in The Netherlands. Copyright 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd..

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  • Bas Postema & Marie Goppelsroeder & Peter AG Bergeijk, 2006. "Cost and Benefits of Merger Control: An Applied Game Theoretic Perspective -super-," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(1), pages 85-98, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:59:y:2006:i:1:p:85-98

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. van Bergeijk, P.A.G., 2009. "What could anti-trust in the OECD do for development?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 18720, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    2. Hüschelrath, Kai, 2008. "Is it Worth all the Trouble? The Costs and Benefits of Antitrust Enforcement," ZEW Discussion Papers 08-107, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

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