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Hooliganism and Police Tactics

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  • PANU POUTVAARA
  • MIKAEL PRIKS

Abstract

In this paper, we introduce a model of hooliganism to study how different types of policing can be expected to affect violence and the number of hooligans in violent supporter clubs. Hooligans differ in their preferred level of fighting, and obtain utility also from social identity that belonging to a supporter club gives. We find that an increase in discriminative policing, like intelligence units, always reduces violence. Indiscriminate policing, such as the use of teargas or random jailing of potential law breakers, may, however, backfire and result in smaller and more brutal groups. Copyright © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc..

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  • Panu Poutvaara & Mikael Priks, 2009. "Hooliganism and Police Tactics," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 11(3), pages 441-453, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jpbect:v:11:y:2009:i:3:p:441-453
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    8. Bruno S. Frey, 2004. "Dealing with Terrorism – Stick or Carrot?," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3435.
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    Cited by:

    1. Robert Dur & Joël Van Der Weele, 2013. "Status-Seeking in Criminal Subcultures and the Double Dividend of Zero-Tolerance," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 15(1), pages 77-93, February.
    2. Long, Iain W., 2014. "The Storm Before the Calm? Adverse Effects of Tackling Organised Crime," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2014/8, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    3. Panu Poutvaara & Mikael Priks, 2011. "Unemployment and gang crime: can prosperity backfire?," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 259-273, September.
    4. Long, Iain W., 2013. "Recruitment to Organised Crime," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2013/10, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    5. repec:bla:manchs:v:85:y:2017:i:5:p:541-576 is not listed on IDEAS

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