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What Makes a Paper Influential and Frequently Cited?

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  • William H. Starbuck

Abstract

Social trends that raised the value of esoteric expertise, stimulated the creation of knowledge-intensive firms and so created an opportunity to study some organizations that academics had overlooked. A lack of presuppositions, a useful research method, and thoughtful experts in these firms helped to uncover some surprising behaviours. The resulting paper attracted citations and may have stimulated research about knowledge as a business resource and a managerial challenge. However, the topic continues to pose questions for further research. Copyright (c) 2010 The Author. Journal of Management Studies (c) 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Society for the Advancement of Management Studies.

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  • William H. Starbuck, 2010. "What Makes a Paper Influential and Frequently Cited?," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(7), pages 1394-1404, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jomstd:v:47:y:2010:i:7:p:1394-1404
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gideon D. Markman & Donald S. Siegel & Mike Wright, 2008. "Research and Technology Commercialization," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(8), pages 1401-1423, December.
    2. Namrata Malhotra & Timothy Morris, 2009. "Heterogeneity in Professional Service Firms," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(6), pages 895-922, September.
    3. Wesley M. Cohen & Richard R. Nelson & John P. Walsh, 2000. "Protecting Their Intellectual Assets: Appropriability Conditions and Why U.S. Manufacturing Firms Patent (or Not)," NBER Working Papers 7552, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. World Bank, 2002. "Constructing Knowledge Societies : New Challenges for Tertiary Education," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15224, June.
    5. Joep Cornelissen & Steven W. Floyd, 2009. "The Future Ahead: Imagination, Rigour and the Advancement of Management Studies," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 10-15, January.
    6. Joshua S. Gans & George B. Shepherd, 1994. "How Are the Mighty Fallen: Rejected Classic Articles by Leading Economists," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 165-179, Winter.
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