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The economics of abundance: coal and cotton in Lancashire and the world

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  • THEO BALDERSTON

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  • Theo Balderston, 2010. "The economics of abundance: coal and cotton in Lancashire and the world," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(3), pages 569-590, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:63:y:2010:i:3:p:569-590
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Crafts, Nicholas & Mulatu, Abay, 2006. "How Did the Location of Industry Respond to Falling Transport Costs in Britain Before World War I?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 575-607, September.
    2. Timothy Leunig, 2003. "A British industrial success: productivity in the Lancashire and New England cotton spinning industries a century ago," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 56(1), pages 90-117, February.
    3. Clark, Gregory, 1987. "Why Isn't the Whole World Developed? Lessons from the Cotton Mills," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(01), pages 141-173, March.
    4. E. A. Wrigley, 2007. "English county populations in the later eighteenth century -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 60(1), pages 35-69, February.
    5. E. A. Wrigley, 2007. "Erratum: English county populations in the later eighteenth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 60(2), pages 456-456, May.
    6. Jordi Domenech, 2008. "Labour market adjustment a hundred years ago: the case of the Catalan textile industry, 1880-1913 -super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(1), pages 1-25, February.
    7. E. A. Wrigley, 1962. "The Supply of Raw Materials in the Industrial Revolution," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 15(1), pages 1-16, August.
    8. Stephen Broadberry & Andrew Marrison, 2002. "External economies of scale in the Lancashire cotton industry, 1900–1950[Without im]," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 55(1), pages 51-77, February.
    9. Harley, C. Knick, 1992. "International Competitiveness of the Antebellum American Cotton Textile Industry," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(03), pages 559-584, September.
    10. Brown, John C., 1995. "Imperfect Competition and Anglo-German Trade Rivalry: Markets for Cotton Textiles before 1914," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(03), pages 494-527, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sofia Teives Henriques & Paul Sharp, 2016. "The Danish agricultural revolution in an energy perspective: a case of development with few domestic energy sources," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 69(3), pages 844-869, August.
    2. Crafts, Nicholas & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2014. "The Location of the UK Cotton Textiles Industry in 1838: A Quantitative Analysis," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(04), pages 1103-1139, December.
    3. Stéphane BECUWE & Bertrand BLANCHETON, 2016. "French Textile Specialisation in Long Run Perspective (1836-1938) : Trade Policy as Industrial Policy," Cahiers du GREThA 2016-17, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    4. Alan Fernihough & Kevin Hjorstshøj O’Rourke, 2014. "Coal and the European Industrial Revolution," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _124, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    5. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2011. "Industrial Catching Up in the Poor Periphery 1870-1975," NBER Working Papers 16809, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2010. "When, Where, and Why? Early Industrialization in the Poor Periphery 1870-1940," NBER Working Papers 16344, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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