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La competitividad internacional de la industria algodonera española (1830-1860)

  • Joan R. Roses

    ()

Con el fin de explicar las grandes diferencias de precios entre los tejidos de algodón británicos y españoles, este articulo se ocupa de medir el coste de las materias primas y estimar los niveles de productividad total de los factores (PTF) en ambos países. Ambos cálculos sugieren una relación directa entre la falta de competitividad internacional de la industria española y los altos niveles de protección. Así, a 10 largo de artículo se demuestra que la especialización inadecuada, que fue una consecuencia directa de los altos aranceles, redujo los niveles de eficiencia en España porque las fabricas locales producían bienes demasiado sofisticados para las habilidades de su fuerza de trabajo.

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Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Instituto Figuerola de Historia y Ciencias Sociales in its series Working Papers in Economic History with number dh001401.

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Date of creation: Jan 2000
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Handle: RePEc:cte:whrepe:dh001401
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  1. Krugman, Paul, 1995. "Increasing returns, imperfect competition and the positive theory of international trade," Handbook of International Economics, in: G. M. Grossman & K. Rogoff (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 24, pages 1243-1277 Elsevier.
  2. H. M. Boot, 1995. "How skilled were Lancashire cotton factory workers in 1833?," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 48(2), pages 283-303, 05.
  3. Romer, Paul, 1994. "New goods, old theory, and the welfare costs of trade restrictions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 5-38, February.
  4. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521142663 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Harley, C. Knick, 1992. "International Competitiveness of the Antebellum American Cotton Textile Industry," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 52(03), pages 559-584, September.
  6. Clark, Gregory, 1987. "Why Isn't the Whole World Developed? Lessons from the Cotton Mills," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(01), pages 141-173, March.
  7. Sokoloff, Kenneth L., 1984. "Was the transition from the artisanal shop to the nonmechanized factory associated with gains in efficiency?: Evidence from the U.S. Manufacturing censuses of 1820 and 1850," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 351-382, October.
  8. M. Blaug, 1961. "The Productivity Of Capital In The Lancashire Cotton Industry During The Nineteenth Century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 13(3), pages 358-381, 04.
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