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Migration, Social Networks, And Credit: Empirical Evidence From Peru

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  • Sonia LASZLO
  • Eric SANTOR

Abstract

We seek evidence of the causal relationship between migration, social networks, and the probability of receiving credit in a developing country where credit markets are weak and internal migration is common. Migrants may face binding asymmetric information constraints as they often lack collateral. Social networks can help mitigate these constraints. Conversely, migrants might face higher liquidity constraints and might, therefore, demand more credit than nonmigrants. The effect of migration on participation in the credit market is thus ambiguous. Compounding this, migration and credit may be jointly determined. We utilize rich data from Peru to establish the net effect of migration on credit and the role that social networks play in this relationship.

Suggested Citation

  • Sonia LASZLO & Eric SANTOR, 2009. "Migration, Social Networks, And Credit: Empirical Evidence From Peru," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 47(4), pages 383-409, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:deveco:v:47:y:2009:i:4:p:383-409
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1049.2009.00091.x
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    1. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    2. Yasuyuki SAWADA & Kensuke KUBO & Nobuhiko FUWA & Seiro ITO & Takashi KUROSAKI, 2006. "On The Mother And Child Labor Nexus Under Credit Constraints: Findings From Rural India," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 44(4), pages 465-499, December.
    3. W. Bruce Wydick, 1999. "Credit access, human capital and class structure mobility," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(6), pages 131-152.
    4. Okten, Cagla & Osili, Una Okonkwo, 2004. "Social Networks and Credit Access in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1225-1246, July.
    5. Munshi, Kaivan, 2004. "Social learning in a heterogeneous population: technology diffusion in the Indian Green Revolution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 185-213, February.
    6. Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1981. "Credit Rationing in Markets with Imperfect Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(3), pages 393-410, June.
    7. Abhijit Banerjee & Kaivan Munshi, 2004. "How Efficiently is Capital Allocated? Evidence from the Knitted Garment Industry in Tirupur," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(1), pages 19-42.
    8. Rafael Gomez & Eric Santor, 2001. "Membership has its privileges: the effect of social capital and neighbourhood characteristics on the earnings of microfinance borrowers," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 34(4), pages 943-966, November.
    9. William N. Evans & Robert M. Schwab, 1995. "Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 941-974.
    10. Biggs, Tyler & Raturi, Mayank & Srivastava, Pradeep, 2002. "Ethnic networks and access to credit: evidence from the manufacturing sector in Kenya," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 473-486, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jose Galdo, 2013. "The Long-Run Labor-Market Consequences of Civil War: Evidence from the Shining Path in Peru," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(4), pages 789-823.
    2. Sarah Pearlman, 2014. "Dropouts, Defaulters, and Continuing Borrowers: Client Exit from Microfinance," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(4), pages 301-321, December.
    3. Grimard, F. & Laszlo, S., 2014. "Long-Term Effects of Civil Conflict on Women’s Health Outcomes in Peru," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 139-155.
    4. Alain Kikandi Kiuma & Christian Kamala Kaghoma & Joelle Mukenyi Kalala & Allegra Kabamba Mbuyi, 2015. "Mobilité interne et entrepreneuriat des jeunes en République démocratique du Congo," Working Papers PMMA 2015-07, PEP-PMMA.
    5. repec:rfe:zbefri:v:36:y:2018:i:1:p:183-212 is not listed on IDEAS

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