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Impact Of Anti‐Apartheid Sanctions On South Africa: Some Trade And Financial Evidence

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  • WILLIAM H. KAEMPFER
  • MICHAEL H. MOFFETT

Abstract

Economic sanctions against South Africa presumably are intended to cause economic damage. Trade sanctions should induce the South African terms of trade to deteriorate, and investment sanctions should cause capital flight and cause the exchange rate to deteriorate. However, due to the nature of the South African economy and to certain policies of the South African government, these impacts may be difficult to achieve.

Suggested Citation

  • William H. Kaempfer & Michael H. Moffett, 1988. "Impact Of Anti‐Apartheid Sanctions On South Africa: Some Trade And Financial Evidence," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 6(4), pages 118-129, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:6:y:1988:i:4:p:118-129
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1465-7287.1988.tb00551.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1465-7287.1988.tb00551.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lundahl, Mats, 1984. " Economic Effects of a Trade and Investment Boycott against South Africa," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 86(1), pages 68-83.
    2. Thomas O. Bayard & Joseph Pelzman & Jorge Perez‐Lopez, 1983. "Stakes and Risks in Economic Sanctions," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(1), pages 73-88, March.
    3. Bernard Feigenbaum & Anton D. Lowenberg, 1988. "South African Disinvestment: Causes And Effects," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 6(4), pages 105-117, October.
    4. Kaempfer, William H & Lowenberg, Anton D, 1986. "A Model of the Political Economy of International Investment Sanctions: The Case of South Africa," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(3), pages 377-396.
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    Cited by:

    1. Russell Sobel, 1998. "Exchange rate evidence on the effectiveness of United Nations policy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 95(1), pages 1-25, April.
    2. Judith F. Posnikoff, 1997. "Disinvestment From South Africa: They Did Well By Doing Good," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 15(1), pages 76-86, January.
    3. Bernard Feigenbaum & Anton D. Lowenberg, 1988. "South African Disinvestment: Causes And Effects," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 6(4), pages 105-117, October.

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