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Testing Regulatory Consistency

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  • ROBERT BREUNIG
  • FLAVIO M. MENEZES

Abstract

We undertake an analysis of regulatory consistency using a database of publicly available regulatory decisions in Australia. We propose a simple exploratory model which allows us to test for regulatory consistency across jurisdictions and industries without detailed knowledge of the regulatory process. We compare two measures using our approach--the weighted average cost of capital and the proportion of firms’ revenue requirement claims disallowed by the regulator. We advocate use of the second measure, but our empirical results may be interpreted as indicating that a range of measures ought to be considered when assessing regulatory consistency.
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Suggested Citation

  • Robert Breunig & Flavio M. Menezes, 2012. "Testing Regulatory Consistency," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 30(1), pages 60-74, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:30:y:2012:i:1:p:60-74
    DOI: j.1465-7287.2010.00249.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1465-7287.2010.00249.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Timothy Besley & Stephen Coate, 2003. "Elected Versus Appointed Regulators: Theory and Evidence," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(5), pages 1176-1206, September.
    2. Robert Breunig & Jeremy Hornby & Scott Stacey & Flavio Menezes, 2006. "Price Regulation in Australia: How Consistent Has It Been?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(256), pages 67-76, March.
    3. Geoff Edwards & Leonard Waverman, 2006. "The Effects of Public Ownership and Regulatory Independence on Regulatory Outcomes," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 23-67, January.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Making the case for selling off Queensland's power assets
      by Flavio Menezes, Professor of Economics at The University of Queensland in The Conversation on 2014-10-08 06:02:51

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    Cited by:

    1. Nepal, Rabindra & Menezes, Flavio & Jamasb, Tooraj, 2014. "Network regulation and regulatory institutional reform: Revisiting the case of Australia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 259-268.
    2. Rod Tyers, 2015. "Service Oligopolies and Australia's Economy-Wide Performance," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 48(4), pages 333-356, December.
    3. Flavio Menezes & Magnus Söderberg & Miguel Santolino, 2012. "Regulatory behaviour under threat of court reversal," Discussion Papers Series 472, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    4. Söderberg, Magnus & Menezes, Flavio M. & Santolino, Miguel, 2018. "Regulatory behaviour under threat of court reversal: Theory and evidence from the Swedish electricity market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 302-310.

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