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Global Linkages of Subnational Regions: Coastal Exports and International Networks

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  • Ashok Deo Bardhan
  • Subhrajit Guhathakurta

Abstract

This article explores the determinants of exports of the two coastal regions of the continental United States and the differences between them. The authors evaluate the contribution of international sociocultural and business networks to exports of the two major coastal regions of the United States, the West Coast and the East Coast, and examine their geographic trading affinities. The article finds that although transnational business ties play a significant positive role in boosting overall exports of both coasts, social networks of foreign-born immigrants play a similar role only for the West Coast. The study also suggests that the significance of distance as a proxy for transportation costs is somewhat diminished once these networks are taken into account. Both regions seem to share a propensity for exports to the Asia-Pacific region. (JEL "R0", "F10", "F20") Copyright 2004 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Ashok Deo Bardhan & Subhrajit Guhathakurta, 2004. "Global Linkages of Subnational Regions: Coastal Exports and International Networks," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(2), pages 225-236, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:22:y:2004:i:2:p:225-236
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Murat Genc & Masood Gheasi & Peter Nijkamp & Jacques Poot, 2012. "The impact of immigration on international trade: a meta-analysis," Chapters,in: Migration Impact Assessment, chapter 9, pages 301-337 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Cletus C. Coughlin & Howard J. Wall, 2008. "Ethnic Networks and US Exports," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(1), pages 199-213, February.
    3. Ben Dolman, 2007. "Patterns of Migration, Trade and Foreign Direct Investment across OECD Countries," DEGIT Conference Papers c012_030, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    4. Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Peri, Giovanni & Wright, Greg C., 2018. "Immigration, trade and productivity in services: Evidence from U.K. firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 88-108.
    5. Chaudhry, Azam & Ikram, Rabia, 2015. "Does genetic proximity to high growth countries affect a country's own growth?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 444-453.
    6. Dilip Ratha & Sanket Mohapatra & Caglar Ozden & Sonia Plaza & William Shaw & Abebe Shimeles, 2011. "Leveraging Migration for Africa : Remittances, Skills, and Investments
      [Optimisation du phénomène migratoire pour l’Afrique : Envois de fonds, compétences et investissements]
      ," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2300, September.
    7. Steingress, Walter, 2015. "The Causal Impact of Migration on US Trade: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 9058, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. César Ducruet & Hidekazu Itoh, 2016. "Regions and material flows: investigating the regional branching and industry relatedness of port traffics in a global perspective," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(4), pages 805-830.
    9. Andreas Hatzigeorgiou & Magnus Lodefalk, 2015. "Trade, Migration and Integration – Evidence and Policy Implications," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(12), pages 2013-2048, December.
    10. Sonia Plaza, 2013. "Diaspora resources and policies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 27, pages 505-529 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Duanmu, Jing-Lin & Guney, Yilmaz, 2013. "Heterogeneous effect of ethnic networks on international trade of Thailand: The role of family ties and ethnic diversity," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 126-139.
    12. David Law & Murat Genç & John Bryant, 2013. "Trade, Diaspora and Migration to New Zealand," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(5), pages 582-606, May.
    13. Roger White, 2010. "Migration and International Trade," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 13670.
    14. Christopher R. Parsons & L. Alan Winters, 2014. "International migration, trade and aid: a survey," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 4, pages 65-112 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Christopher Parsons, "undated". "Do Migrants Really Foster Trade? The Trade-Migration Nexus, a Panel Approach 1960-2000," Discussion Papers 11/10, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    16. BELLINO, Antonella & CELI, Giuseppe, 2016. "The Migration-Trade Nexus in the Presence of Vertical and Horizontal Product Differentiation," CELPE Discussion Papers 137, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R0 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General

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