IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/coecpo/v17y1999i2p189-198.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

An Analysis Of The Factors That Influence Student Performance: A Fresh Approach To An Old Debate

Author

Listed:
  • SANJIV JAGGIA
  • ALISON KELLY-HAWKE

Abstract

There is a general consensus that student performance at all levels has been deteriorating. Despite numerous attempts by researchers to link school expenditures with student performance, a clear relationship does not exist. Since a number of difficulties plague earlier studies, this paper attempts to remedy these problems by offering a better data design and a sounder methodology. This study uses the J 992 Massachusetts Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) test scores from 4-super-th, 8-super-th, and 12-super-th grade students to measure student performance. Since each student's grade falls into one of five possible categories, the application of an ordered logit model incorporates the natural ordering of the MEAP scores. The results indicate that family background and the stability of a community are the main factors affecting student performance. The data suggest that higher levels of spending have no consistent or systematic relation with student performance. (JEL 12, C25) Copyright 1999 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Sanjiv Jaggia & Alison Kelly-Hawke, 1999. "An Analysis Of The Factors That Influence Student Performance: A Fresh Approach To An Old Debate," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 17(2), pages 189-198, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:17:y:1999:i:2:p:189-198
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1465-7287.1999.tb00674.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hanushek, Eric A & Rivkin, Steven G & Taylor, Lori L, 1996. "Aggregation and the Estimated Effects of School Resources," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(4), pages 611-627, November.
    2. Stern, David, 1989. "Educational cost factors and student achievement in grades 3 and 6: Some new evidence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 149-158, April.
    3. Sander, William, 1993. "Expenditures and student achievement in Illinois : New evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 403-416, October.
    4. Caroline Minter Hoxby, 1996. "How Teachers' Unions Affect Education Production," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(3), pages 671-718.
    5. Betts, Julian R, 1995. "Does School Quality Matter? Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(2), pages 231-250, May.
    6. Amemiya, Takeshi, 1981. "Qualitative Response Models: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 19(4), pages 1483-1536, December.
    7. Boardman, Anthony E. & Davis, Otto A. & Sanday, Peggy R., 1977. "A simultaneous equations model of the educational process," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 23-49, February.
    8. Akerhielm, Karen, 1995. "Does class size matter?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 229-241, September.
    9. Hanushek, Eric A, 1986. "The Economics of Schooling: Production and Efficiency in Public Schools," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 1141-1177, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Adel Ben Youssef & Mounir Dahmani, 2008. "The Impact of ICT on Student Performance in Higher Education: Direct Effects, Indirect Effects and Organisational Change," Post-Print halshs-00936560, HAL.
    2. Zhang, Lemin & Marsh, Dan, 2006. "How Can We Predict Performance in Tertiary Level Economics?," 2006 Conference, August 24-25, 2006, Nelson, New Zealand 31974, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Mensah, Yaw M. & Schoderbek, Michael P. & Sahay, Savita P., 2013. "The effect of administrative pay and local property taxes on student achievement scores: Evidence from New Jersey public schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 1-16.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:17:y:1999:i:2:p:189-198. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/weaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.