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PanelWhiz and the Australian Longitudinal Data Infrastructure in Economics

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  • Markus H. Hahn
  • John P. Haisken-DeNew

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  • Markus H. Hahn & John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2013. "PanelWhiz and the Australian Longitudinal Data Infrastructure in Economics," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 46(3), pages 379-386, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:46:y:2013:i:3:p:379-386
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joachim R. Frick & Stephen P. Jenkins & Dean R. Lillard & Oliver Lipps & Mark Wooden, 2007. "European Data Watch: The Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF) and its Member Country Household Panel Studies," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 127(4), pages 627-654.
    2. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Markus H. Hahn, 2010. "PanelWhiz: Efficient Data Extraction of Complex Panel Data Sets - An Example Using the German SOEP," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 130(4), pages 643-654.
    3. Gary N. Marks & Sheldon Rothman, 2003. "Longitudinal Studies of Australian Youth," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 36(4), pages 428-434, December.
    4. Mark Wooden & Simon Freidin & Nicole Watson, 2002. "The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA)Survey: Wave 1," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(3), pages 339-348, September.
    5. Matthew Gray & Diana Smart, 2009. "Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children: A Valuable New Data Source for Economists," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(3), pages 367-376, September.
    6. Mark Wooden & Nicole Watson, 2007. "The HILDA Survey and its Contribution to Economic and Social Research (So Far)," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(261), pages 208-231, June.
    7. Killian Mullan & Gerry Redmond, 2012. "A Socio-Economic Profile of Families in the First Wave of the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(2), pages 232-245, June.
    8. Wenda Yan & Terence Chai Cheng & Anthony Scott & Catherine M. Joyce & John Humphreys & Guyonne Kalb & Anne Leahy, 2011. "Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL)," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 44(1), pages 102-112, March.
    9. John P. Haisken‐DeNew, 2001. "A Hitchhiker's Guide to the World's Household Panel Data Sets," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(3), pages 356-366, September.
    10. Guay C. Lim & Chew Lian Chua & Edda Claus & Viet H. Nguyen, 2012. "Review of the Australian Economy 2011–12: A Case of Déjà Vu," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(1), pages 1-13, February.
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