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PanelWhiz and the Australian Longitudinal Data Infrastructure in Economics

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  • Markus H. Hahn
  • John P. Haisken-DeNew

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  • Markus H. Hahn & John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2013. "PanelWhiz and the Australian Longitudinal Data Infrastructure in Economics," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 46(3), pages 379-386, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:46:y:2013:i:3:p:379-386
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8462.2013.12010.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Wooden & Nicole Watson, 2007. "The HILDA Survey and its Contribution to Economic and Social Research (So Far)," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 83(261), pages 208-231, June.
    2. Joachim R. Frick & Stephen P. Jenkins & Dean R. Lillard & Oliver Lipps & Mark Wooden, 2007. "European Data Watch: The Cross-National Equivalent File (CNEF) and its Member Country Household Panel Studies," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 127(4), pages 627-654.
    3. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Markus H. Hahn, 2010. "PanelWhiz: Efficient Data Extraction of Complex Panel Data Sets - An Example Using the German SOEP," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 130(4), pages 643-654.
    4. Killian Mullan & Gerry Redmond, 2012. "A Socio-Economic Profile of Families in the First Wave of the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(2), pages 232-245, June.
    5. Gary N. Marks & Sheldon Rothman, 2003. "Longitudinal Studies of Australian Youth," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 36(4), pages 428-434.
    6. Wenda Yan & Terence Chai Cheng & Anthony Scott & Catherine M. Joyce & John Humphreys & Guyonne Kalb & Anne Leahy, 2011. "Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL)," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 44(1), pages 102-112, March.
    7. John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2001. "A Hitchhiker's Guide to the World's Household Panel Data Sets," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(3), pages 356-366.
    8. Guay C. Lim & Chew Lian Chua & Edda Claus & Viet H. Nguyen, 2012. "Review of the Australian Economy 2011–12: A Case of Déjà Vu," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 45(1), pages 1-13, February.
    9. Mark Wooden & Simon Freidin & Nicole Watson, 2002. "The Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA)Survey: Wave 1," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(3), pages 339-348.
    10. Matthew Gray & Diana Smart, 2009. "Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children: A Valuable New Data Source for Economists," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(3), pages 367-376.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kavanagh, Anne M. & Aitken, Zoe & Baker, Emma & LaMontagne, Anthony D. & Milner, Allison & Bentley, Rebecca, 2016. "Housing tenure and affordability and mental health following disability acquisition in adulthood," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 225-232.
    2. repec:zbw:rwirep:0510 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. David C. Ribar, 2015. "Is Leaving Home a Hardship?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 81(3), pages 598-618, January.
    4. Hielke Buddelmeyer & Daniel S. Hamermesh & Mark Wooden, 2015. "The Stress Cost of Children," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2015n01, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Averett, Susan L. & Bansak, Cynthia & Smith, Julie K., 2018. "Behind Every High Earning Man Is a Conscientious Woman: A Study of the Impact of Spousal Personality on Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 11756, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Diana Warren & John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2013. "Early Bird Catches the Worm: The Causal Impact of Pre-school Participation and Teacher Qualifications on Year 3 National NAPLAN Cognitive Tests," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2013n34, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    7. Nicolai Suppa, 2016. "Comparing Monetary and Multidimensional Poverty in Germany," OPHI Working Papers ophiwp103_1.pdf, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    8. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Kassenboehmer, Sonja C. & Sinning, Mathias G., 2016. "Locus of control and savings," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 113-130.
    9. Robert Stelter, 2016. "Fertility and health insurance types in Germany," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016021, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    10. Nicolai Suppa, 2018. "Towards a multidimensional poverty index for Germany," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 45(4), pages 655-683, November.
    11. Hamermesh, Daniel S. & Kawaguchi, Daiji & Lee, Jungmin, 2017. "Does labor legislation benefit workers? Well-being after an hours reduction," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 1-12.
    12. repec:zbw:rwirep:0536 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & Powdthavee, Nattavudh, 2016. "Can having internal locus of control insure against negative shocks? Psychological evidence from panel data," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 88-109.
    14. Kunze, Lars & Suppa, Nicolai, 2017. "Bowling alone or bowling at all? The effect of unemployment on social participation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 213-235.
    15. Ong, Qiyan & Theseira, Walter, 2016. "Does choosing jobs based on income risk lead to higher job satisfaction in the long run? Evidence from the natural experiment of German reunification," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 95-108.
    16. Lars Kunze & Nicolai Suppa, 2014. "Bowling Alone or Bowling at All? The Effect of Unemployment on Social Participation," Ruhr Economic Papers 0510, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    17. Schaffner, Sandra & Treude, Barbara, 2014. "The Effect of Ethnic Clustering on Migrant Integration in Germany," Ruhr Economic Papers 536, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    18. repec:bla:ausecr:v:50:y:2017:i:3:p:356-362 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Decker, Simon & Schmitz, Hendrik, 2016. "Health shocks and risk aversion," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 156-170.
    20. repec:bla:ausecr:v:51:y:2018:i:2:p:276-285 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. repec:eee:eecrev:v:109:y:2018:i:c:p:148-161 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. Melisa Bubonya & Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & David C. Ribar, 2017. "The Bilateral Relationship between Depressive Symptoms and Employment Status," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2017n10, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

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