IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/arp/ijefrr/2018p22-29.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

What Determines The Financing Supply of Islamic Banks? A Multicountry Study

Author

Listed:
  • Shakeel Riaz

    (PhD Scholar, Institute of Islamic Banking and Finance, University of Management and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan)

  • Dr. Talat Hussain

    (Assistant Professor, Institute of Islamic Banking and Finance, University of Management and Technology, Lahore, Pakistan)

Abstract

Smooth functioning a bank depends on the stability of stream of returns that it gets from its financing decision. This study is an attempt to showcase the reason for idling or shortage of funds and the factors for the case of Islamic banking. This effort will determine the strategy which can boost the financing in the economy, for this, this study has used the panel data of full-fledged Islamic banks from countries Pakistan and Malaysia, spanning to several years and based on several banks. Based on the analysis of internal and external factors of Islamic banks, it can be seen that increase in the market rate leads to decrease in demand of financing while the increase in deposits and equity do not show a proportional increase in financing which hints that there is excess liquidity available in the Islamic banks. On the positive side, it is evident that increase in the economic activity boosts the demand for Islamic financing.

Suggested Citation

  • Shakeel Riaz & Dr. Talat Hussain, 2018. "What Determines The Financing Supply of Islamic Banks? A Multicountry Study," International Journal of Economics and Financial Research, Academic Research Publishing Group, vol. 4(1), pages 22-29, 01-2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:arp:ijefrr:2018:p:22-29
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.arpgweb.com/pdf-files/ijefr4(1)22-29.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: https://www.arpgweb.com/?ic=journal&journal=5&month=01-2018&issue=1&volume=4
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Driscoll, John C., 2004. "Does bank lending affect output? Evidence from the U.S. states," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 451-471, April.
    2. Ugo Albertazzi & Margherita Bottero, 2013. "Foreign Bank Lending: Evidence from the Global Financial Crisis," NBER Chapters, in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2013, pages 22-35, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Bengt Holmstrom & Jean Tirole, 1997. "Financial Intermediation, Loanable Funds, and The Real Sector," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 663-691.
    4. Daniel Paravisini, 2008. "Local Bank Financial Constraints and Firm Access to External Finance," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 63(5), pages 2161-2193, October.
    5. Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Atif Mian, 2008. "Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks: Evidence from an Emerging Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1413-1442, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Andrea Orame, 2020. "The role of bank supply in the Italian credit market: evidence from a new regional survey," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1279, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan & Elias Papaioannou & José-Luis Peydró, 2013. "Financial Regulation, Financial Globalization, and the Synchronization of Economic Activity," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 68(3), pages 1179-1228, June.
    3. Smolyansky, Michael, 2019. "Policy externalities and banking integration," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(3), pages 118-139.
    4. Rhys Bidder & John Krainer & Adam Shapiro, 2021. "De-leveraging or de-risking? How banks cope with loss," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 39, pages 100-127, January.
    5. Rodrigo Barbone Gonzalez, 2019. "Monetary policy surprises and employment: evidence from matched bank-firm loan data on the bank lending-channel," BIS Working Papers 799, Bank for International Settlements.
    6. van Holle, Frederiek, 2017. "Essays in empirical finance and monetary policy," Other publications TiSEM 30d11a4b-7bc9-4c81-ad24-5, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    7. Rhys Bidder & John Krainer & Adam Shapiro, 2021. "De-leveraging or de-risking? How banks cope with loss," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 39, pages 100-127, January.
    8. Gabriel Jiménez & Steven Ongena & José-Luis Peydró & Jesús Saurina, 2017. "Do demand or supply factors drive bank credit,in good and crisis times?," Economics Working Papers 1567, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    9. Marcello Pagnini & Paola Rossi & Valerio Vacca & Vincenzo Chiorazzo & Vincenzo D'Apice & Pierluigi Morelli & Giovanni Walter Puopolo, 2017. "Economic Activity and Credit Market Linkages: New Evidence From Italy," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 46(3), pages 491-526, November.
    10. Veronica Rappoport & Philipp Schnabl & Daniel Paravisini, 2015. "Comparative Advantage and Specialization in Bank Lending," 2015 Meeting Papers 499, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    11. Cem Demiroglu & Christopher James & Atay Kizilaslan, 2012. "Bank Lending Standards and Access to Lines of Credit," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44(6), pages 1063-1089, September.
    12. Lončarski, Igor & Marinč, Matej, 2020. "The political economy of relationship banking," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 51(C).
    13. Michael Smolyansky, 2016. "Policy Externalities and Banking Integration," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-8, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    14. Chava, Sudheer & Purnanandam, Amiyatosh, 2011. "The effect of banking crisis on bank-dependent borrowers," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 116-135, January.
    15. Mariassunta Giannetti & Andrei Simonov, 2013. "On the Real Effects of Bank Bailouts: Micro Evidence from Japan," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 135-167, January.
    16. Valentina Michelangeli & José-Luis Peydró & Enrico Sette, 2020. "Credit Demand versus Supply Channels: Experimental- and Administrative-Based Evidence," Working Papers 1192, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    17. Schiozer, Rafael F. & Oliveira, Raquel de Freitas, 2016. "Asymmetric transmission of a bank liquidity shock," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 234-246.
    18. Erik Gilje & Elena Loutskina & Philip E. Strahan, 2013. "Exporting Liquidity: Branch Banking and Financial Integration," NBER Working Papers 19403, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Pierre Pessarossi & Frédéric Vinas, 2015. "The supply of long-term credit after a funding shock: evidence from 2007-2009," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 15073, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    20. Rappoport, Veronica & Federico, Stefano & Hassan, Fadi, 2019. "Trade shocks and credit reallocation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 103422, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:arp:ijefrr:2018:p:22-29. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.arpgweb.com/?ic=journal&journal=5&info=aims .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Managing Editor (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.arpgweb.com/?ic=journal&journal=5&info=aims .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.