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Nutritional Labeling and Consumer Choices

Author

Listed:
  • Kristin Kiesel

    () (Economics Department, California State University, Sacramento, California 95819)

  • Jill J. McCluskey

    () (School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-6210)

  • Sofia B. Villas-Boas

    () (Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-3310)

Abstract

In 1994, nutritional facts panels became mandatory for processed foods to improve consumer access to nutritional information and to promote healthy food choices. Recent applied work is reviewed here in terms of how consumers value and respond to nutritional labels. We first summarize the health and nutritional links found in the literature and frame this discussion in terms of the obesity policy debate. Second, we discuss several approaches that have been used to empirically investigate consumer responses to nutritional labels: (a) surveys, (b) nonexperimental approaches utilizing revealed preferences, and (c) experiment-based approaches. We conclude with a discussion and suggest avenues of future research.

Suggested Citation

  • Kristin Kiesel & Jill J. McCluskey & Sofia B. Villas-Boas, 2011. "Nutritional Labeling and Consumer Choices," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 3(1), pages 141-158, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:anr:reseco:v:3:y:2011:p:141-158
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    File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.resource.012809.103957
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Azzurra Annunziata & Angela Mariani, 2016. "The role of nutritional labeling in promoting healthier food choices: a review of the major issues in the EU," RIVISTA DI STUDI SULLA SOSTENIBILITA', FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2016(2), pages 107-119.
    2. Olivier Bonroy & Christos Constantatos, 2015. "On the Economics of Labels: How Their Introduction Affects the Functioning of Markets and the Welfare of All Participants," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(1), pages 239-259.
    3. Sedef Akgungor & Andrea Groppel-Klein & Joerg Koenigstorfer & Yaprak Gulcan & Yesim Kustepeli, 2016. "The Impact of Nutrition Labels on Food Sales: An In-Store Experiment in a Turkish Supermarket," ECONOMIA AGRO-ALIMENTARE, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 18(2), pages 207-228.
    4. Zilberman, David & Kaplan, Scott, 2014. "What the Adoption Literature can teach us about Social Media and Network Effects on Food Choices," 2014 AAEA/EAAE/CAES Joint Symposium: Social Networks, Social Media and the Economics of Food, May 29-30, 2014, Montreal, Canada 173076, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Canadian Agricultural Economics Society;European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Liu, Xiaoou & Lopez, Rigoberto & Zhu, Chen, 2015. "Can Voluntary Nutrition Labeling Lead to a Healthier Food Market?," 2016 Allied Social Science Association (ASSA) Annual Meeting, January 3-5, 2016, San Francisco, California 212818, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Wang, Emily Y. & Wei, Hongli & Caswell, Julie A., 2016. "The impact of mandatory trans fat labeling on product mix and consumer choice: A longitudinal analysis of the U.S. Market for margarine and spreads," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 63-81.
    7. Kim, Hyeyoung & House, Lisa, 2012. "Impact of Added Sugar Information of Front-of-Pack Labels on Consumers’ Beverage Health Perception Changes," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124713, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. repec:gbl:wpaper:2013-01 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    information; food demand; consumer behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • L15 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Information and Product Quality
    • M38 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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