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The Demand for Wine Tourism in Canyon County, Idaho

  • Taylor, R. Garth
  • Woodall, Stacie
  • Wandschneider, Philip R.
  • Foltz, John C.

Many commercial wineries produce a dual product: commercial wine and wine tourism. Since Idaho wineries charge no entry price, wine tourism demand can only be ascertained with a shadow price for winery visitation. Demand for wine tourism visits for Canyon County in southern Idaho was estimated using the travel cost method. Trip demand was inelastic (-0.4 to -0.6) with respect to own price. The average value of Canyon County wine tourism ranged from $6 to $12 per person per trip, depending upon the assumed opportunity cost of travel time. Elasticities of tastes and preferences, closely related goods, and income were estimated with a view to understanding the market for Idaho's emerging wine tourism industry.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/8125
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Article provided by International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IAMA) in its journal International Food and Agribusiness Management Review.

Volume (Year): 07 (2004)
Issue (Month): 04 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:ifaamr:8125
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