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Land Abandonment in an Agricultural Frontier After a Plant Invasion: The Case of Bracken Fern in Southern Yucatan, Mexico

  • Schneider, Laura
  • Geoghegan, Jacqueline

Plant invasions and their impact on land use pose difficult research questions, due to the complex relationships between the ecological nature of the invasion and the human responses to the invasion. This paper focuses on the linkages between an invasion of bracken fern and land use decisions in an agricultural frontier in southern Mexico. Agriculture in this region is practiced on an extensive basis, using traditional slash-and-burn techniques of temporary cultivation and continuous rotation through forest fallow. We investigate the factors that affect the decision of a subsistence farmer to either continue cultivating an invaded agricultural plot or permanently abandon the plot and cultivate elsewhere. We develop an agricultural household model of land use choices, where households maximize utility subject to constraints on land, labor, and income. We subsequently test the hypotheses raised, using data from a small household survey performed in the region in 2002.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/10184
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Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.

Volume (Year): 35 (2006)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:10184
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.narea.org/

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  1. Krautkraemer, Jeffrey A., 1994. "Population growth, soil fertility, and agricultural intensification," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 403-428, August.
  2. Hazell, Peter, 2001. "Agriculture and the environment," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(04), pages 503-531, October.
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  4. J. Taylor & Irma Adelman, 2003. "Agricultural Household Models: Genesis, Evolution, and Extensions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 33-58, January.
  5. Linwood H. Pendleton & E. Lance Howe, 2002. "Market Integration, Development, and Smallholder Forest Clearance," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 78(1), pages 1-19.
  6. Vance, Colin & Geoghegan, Jacqueline, 2002. "Temporal and spatial modelling of tropical deforestation: a survival analysis linking satellite and household survey data," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 27(3), November.
  7. Albers, Heidi J. & Goldbach, Michael J. & Kaffine, Daniel T., 2006. "Implications of agricultural policy for species invasion in shifting cultivation systems," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(04), pages 429-452, August.
  8. Barrett, Scott, 1991. "Optimal soil conservation and the reform of agricultural pricing policies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 167-187, October.
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