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Effect of Securitization on the Bank’s Equity Risk in the U.S


  • Pituwan Poramapojn

    () (Faculty of Economics, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand)


This paper examines the relationship between the effect of securitization and the equity risk for bank holding companies in the United States from Q2:2001 to Q4:2008. Securitization markets in the U.S. expanded significantly in the early 2000s but have declined since 2007. This paper investigates four types of loans, namely, mortgage, consumer, commercial, and “other” loans (loans secured by real estate other than mortgage loans). When all types of loans are considered as a group, the effect of securitization (the net effect of increasing off-balance sheet loans and reducing on-balance sheet loans) is insignificant in relation to the banks’ equity risk. As a result, the banks use securitization as a financing source to fund new loans rather than as a risk reduction tool. The analysis of each type of loan indicates that the effect of the securitization of mortgage, consumer, and commercial loans is not significantly related to the banks’ equity risk; however, the effect of the securitization of “other” loans is statistically significant in raising the banks’ equity risk. The result shows that the banks still retain risk from securitization and that they use securitization as a financing source. Furthermore, during the subprime crisis, banks that securitized mortgage loans were exposed to risk from retained “credit-enhancing interest-only strips” rather than from the effect of securitization itself.

Suggested Citation

  • Pituwan Poramapojn, 2012. "Effect of Securitization on the Bank’s Equity Risk in the U.S," Applied Economics Journal, Kasetsart University, Faculty of Economics, Center for Applied Economic Research, vol. 19(1), pages 68-86, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:aej:apecjn:v:19:y:2012:i:1:p:68-86

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Malekan, Sara & Dionne, Georges, 2014. "Securitization and optimal retention under moral hazard," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 74-85.
    2. G. Dionne & T. M. Harchaoui, 2002. "Banks’ Capital, Securitization and Credit Risk : An Empirical Evidence for Canada," THEMA Working Papers 2002-33, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    3. Acharya, Viral V. & Schnabl, Philipp & Suarez, Gustavo, 2013. "Securitization without risk transfer," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(3), pages 515-536.
    4. Brent Ambrose & Michael LaCour-Little & Anthony Sanders, 2005. "Does Regulatory Capital Arbitrage, Reputation, or Asymmetric Information Drive Securitization?," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 28(1), pages 113-133, October.
    5. Charles Calomiris & Joseph Mason, 2004. "Credit Card Securitization and Regulatory Arbitrage," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 26(1), pages 5-27, August.
    6. Deming Wu & Jiawen Yang & Han Hong, 2011. "Securitization and Banks’ Equity Risk," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 39(3), pages 95-117, June.
    7. Simon Wolfe, 2000. "Structural effects of asset-backed securitization," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(4), pages 353-369.
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    More about this item


    equity risk; loans; securitization; off-balance sheet;

    JEL classification:

    • C12 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Hypothesis Testing: General
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages


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