IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/aea/aecrev/v101y2011i7p3196-3220.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Extreme Walrasian Dynamics: The Gale Example in the Lab

Author

Listed:
  • Sean Crockett
  • Ryan Oprea
  • Charles Plott

Abstract

We study David Gale's (1963) economy using laboratory markets. Tatonnement theory predicts prices will diverge from an equitable interior equilibrium toward infinity or zero depending only on initial prices. The inequitable equilibria determined by these dynamics give all gains from exchange to one side of the market. We show surprisingly strong support for these predictions. In most sessions one side of the market eventually outgains the other by more than 20 times, leaving the disadvantaged side to trade for mere pennies. We also find preliminary evidence that these dynamics are sticky, resisting exogenous interventions designed to reverse their trajectories. (JEL C92, D50)

Suggested Citation

  • Sean Crockett & Ryan Oprea & Charles Plott, 2011. "Extreme Walrasian Dynamics: The Gale Example in the Lab," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3196-3220, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:101:y:2011:i:7:p:3196-3220
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.101.7.3196
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to AEA members and institutional subscribers.

    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/aer/data/dec2011/20100387_data.zip
    File Function: dataset accompanying article
    Download Restriction: no

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kirman, Alan, 1989. "The Intrinsic Limits of Modern Economic Theory: The Emperor Has No Clothes," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(395), pages 126-139, Supplemen.
    2. Anderson, Christopher M. & Plott, Charles R. & Shimomura, K.-I.Ken-Ichi & Granat, Sander, 2004. "Global instability in experimental general equilibrium: the Scarf example," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 115(2), pages 209-249, April.
    3. Omar Al-Ubaydli & John A. List & Michael K. Price, 2010. "The Nature of Excess: Using Randomized Treatments to Investigate Price Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 16319, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Steven Gjerstad, 2013. "Price dynamics in an exchange economy," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 52(2), pages 461-500, March.
    5. Bergstrom Theodore C & Shimomura Ken-Ichi & Yamato Takehiko, 2009. "Simple Economies with Multiple Equilibria," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-31, December.
    6. Hurwicz, Leonid & Radner, Roy & Reiter, Stanley, 1975. "A Stochastic Decentralized Resource Allocation Process: Part I," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 43(2), pages 187-221, March.
    7. Charles R. Plott & Jared Smith, 1999. "Instability of Equilibria in Experimental Markets: Upward-Sloping Demands, Externalities, and Fad-Like Incentives," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 405-426, January.
    8. Hirota, Masayoshi & Hsu, Ming & Plott, Chrales R. & Rogers, Brian W., 2005. "Divergence, closed cycles and convergence in scarf environments: Experiments in the dynamics of general equilibrium systems," Working Papers 1239, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Goeree, Jacob K. & Lindsay, Luke, 2016. "Market design and the stability of general equilibrium," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 37-68.
    2. John D. Hey & Daniela Di Cagno, 2016. "Does money impede convergence?," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(3), pages 595-612, September.
    3. Yuval Rabani & Leonard J. Schulman, 2016. "The Invisible Hand of Laplace: the Role of Market Structure in Price Convergence and Oscillation," Papers 1602.07628, arXiv.org.
    4. Sean Crockett, 2013. "Price Dynamics In General Equilibrium Experiments," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 27(3), pages 421-438, July.
    5. Crockett, Sean & Friedman, Daniel & Oprea, Ryan, 2017. "Aggregation and convergence in experimental general equilibrium economies constructed from naturally occurring preferences," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship Market Design: Theory and Pragmatics SP II 2017-501, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    6. Plott, Charles & Roy, Nilanjan & Tong, Baojia, 2013. "Marshall and Walras, disequilibrium trades and the dynamics of equilibration in the continuous double auction market," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 190-205.
    7. Hatfield, John William & Plott, Charles R. & Tanaka, Tomomi, 2016. "Price controls, non-price quality competition, and the nonexistence of competitive equilibrium," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 134-163.
    8. E. Randon & P. Simmons, 2012. "A Top Dog Tale with Preference Rigidities," Working Papers wp839, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D50 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - General

    Lists

    This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:
    1. Extreme Walrasian Dynamics: The Gale Example in the Lab (AER 2011) in ReplicationWiki

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:101:y:2011:i:7:p:3196-3220. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jane Voros) or (Michael P. Albert). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aeaaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.