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Work Absenteeism Due to a Chronic Disease

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  • Lacroix, G;
  • Brouard M-E;

Abstract

Research on health-related work absenteeism focuses primarily on moral hazard issues but seldom discriminates between the types of illnesses that prompt workers to stay home or seek care. This paper focuses on chronic migraine, a common and acute illness that can prove to be relatively debilitating. Our analysis is based upon the absenteeism of workers employed in a large Fortune- 100 manufacturing firm in the United States. We model their daily transitions between work and absence spells between January 1996 up until December 1998. Only absences due to migraine and depression, its main comorbidity, are taken into account. Our results show that there is considerable correlation between the different states we consider. In addition, workers who are covered by the Blue Preferred Provided Organization tend to have longer employment spells and shorter migraine spells than workers cover by other insurance packages.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 11/15.

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Date of creation: Jul 2011
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Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:11/15

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Keywords: Migraine; absenteeism; insurance policies; transition models; unobserved heterogeneity;

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