Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Economic Booms and Risky Sexual Behavior: Evidence from Zambian Copper Mining Cities

Contents:

Author Info

Abstract

Existing studies suggest that individual and household level economic shocks affect the demand for and supply of risky sex. However, little evidence exists on the effects of an aggregate shock on equilibrium risky sexual behavior. This paper examines the effects of the early twenty-first century copper boom on risky sexual behavior in Zambian copper mining cities. The results indicate that the copper boom substantially reduced rates of transactional sex and multiple partnerships in copper mining cities. These effects were partly concentrated among young adults and copper boom induced in-migration to mining cities appears to have contributed to these reductions.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/WilsonCopperMining.pdf
File Function: Full text
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Williams College in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 2010-21.

as in new window
Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision: Oct 2011
Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2010-21

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Williamstown, MA 01267
Phone: 413 597 2476
Fax: 413 597 4045
Email:
Web page: http://econ.williams.edu
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: commodity shocks; copper mining; economic growth; HIV/AIDS; Zambia;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Andreas Glöckner & Bernd Irlenbusch & Sebastian Kube & Andreas Nicklisch & Hans-Theo Normann, 2009. "Leading with(out) Sacrifice? A Public-Goods Experiment with a Super-Additive Player," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2009_08, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Sarah Jacobson & Jason Delaney, 2012. "The Good of the Few: Reciprocity and the Provision of a Public Bad," Department of Economics Working Papers, Department of Economics, Williams College 2014-03, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised May 2014.
  2. Nicholas Wilson, 2012. "Shock to the System: Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV and Child Mortality," Department of Economics Working Papers, Department of Economics, Williams College 2012-03, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jul 2013.
  3. Docquier, F. & Vasilakis, Ch. & Tamfutu Munsi, D., 2014. "International migration and the propagation of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 20-33.
  4. Andreas Kotsadam & Anja Tolonen, 2013. "Mineral Mining and Female Employment," Economics Series Working Papers OxCarre Research Paper 11, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2010-21. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Stephen Sheppard).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.