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Income Shocks and HIV in Africa

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  • Burke, Marshall
  • Gong, Erick
  • Jones, Kelly M.

Abstract

We examine how variation in local economic conditions has shaped the AIDS epidemic in Africa. Using data from over 200,000 individuals across 19 countries, we match biomarker data on individuals' HIV status to information on local rainfall shocks, a large source of variation in income for rural households. We estimate that infection rates in HIV-endemic rural areas increase by 11% for every recent drought, an effect that is statistically and economically significant. Income shocks explain up to 20% of the variation in HIV prevalence across African countries, suggesting policy approaches for HIV prevention that are distinct from existing efforts.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 55392.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:55392

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Keywords: income shocks; HIV/AIDS; Africa;

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Cited by:
  1. Wilson, Nicholas, 2012. "Economic booms and risky sexual behavior: Evidence from Zambian copper mining cities," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 797-812.
  2. Waage Skjeflo, Sofie & Bruvik Westberg, Nina, 2014. "Learning the hard way? Adapting to climate risk in Tanzania," CLTS Working Papers, Centre for Land Tenure Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences 4/14, Centre for Land Tenure Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences.
  3. Margherita Calderone & Jean-Francois Maystadt & Liangzhi You, 2013. "Local Warming and Violent Conflict in North and South Sudan," HiCN Working Papers 149, Households in Conflict Network.
  4. Luca Marchiori & Jean-Francois Maystadt & Ingmar Schumacher, 2013. "Is environmentally-induced income variability a driver of migration? A macroeconomic perspective," Working Papers, Department of Research, Ipag Business School 2013-017, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
  5. de Walque, Damien & Dow, William H. & Gong, Erick, 2014. "Coping with risk : the effects of shocks on reproductive health and transactional sex in rural Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6751, The World Bank.
  6. Flatø, Martin & Kotsadam, Andreas, 2014. "Droughts and Gender Bias in Infant Mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa," Memorandum, Oslo University, Department of Economics 02/2014, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

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