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Geographic Clustering and Productivity: An Instrumental Variable Approach for Classical Composers

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  • Karol Jan BOROWIECKI

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin)

Abstract

It is difficult to estimate the impact of geographic clustering on productivity because of endogeneity issues. I use birthplace-cluster distance as an instrumental variable for the incidence of clustering of prominent classical composers born between 1750 and 1899. I find that geographic clustering strongly impacts the productivity of the clustering individuals: composers were approx. 33 percentage points more productive while they remained in a geographic cluster. Top composers and composers who migrated to the cluster are the greatest beneficiaries of clustering. The benefit depends on the clustering intensity and has a long-term impact.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics in its series Trinity Economics Papers with number tep0611.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep0611

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Postal: Trinity College, Dublin 2
Phone: (+ 353 1) 6081325
Fax: 6772503
Web page: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/
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Keywords: geographic concentration; cities; mobility; productivity; urban history; composer;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Borowiecki, Karol J., 2013. "Agglomeration Economies in Classical Music," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 13/2013, Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark.
  2. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2011. "Conflict-induced Migration of Composers: An Individual-level Study," Trinity Economics Papers tep0511, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  3. Alan de BROMHEAD & Karol Jan BOROWIECKI, 2011. "Immigration and the demand for life insurance: Evidence from Canada, 1911," Trinity Economics Papers tep1511, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  4. Patrick Georges & Aylin Seçkin, 2012. "Auction Prices of Classical Music Manuscripts – A Hedonic Approach," Working Papers 1202E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
  5. Karol Jan BOROWIECKI & Georgios KAVETSOS, 2011. "Does Competition Kill? The Case of Classical Composers," Trinity Economics Papers tep1111, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.

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