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The Evolution of Free-Lance Music Composition, 1650–1900

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  • F. Scherer
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    Abstract

    Using qualitative histories and coded data on 645 composers born between 1650and 1849, this article traces the evolution of free-lance activity by musiccomposers over the course of two centuries. Contrary to widely advancedsuppositions, many composers were pursuing free-lance composition as the 17thcentury ended, although more for opera than instrumental music writing. Fromthat time on, free-lance composition expanded steadily, replacing employmentby the church and the nobility. A growing number of composers also acted asimpresarios in organizing their own opera or concert performances. Composersearned their bread in many other ways too. There were clear rising trends intheir employment as private orchestra directors and conservatory professors. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1023/A:1017983532237
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Cultural Economics.

    Volume (Year): 25 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 4 (November)
    Pages: 307-319

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jculte:v:25:y:2001:i:4:p:307-319

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100284

    Related research

    Keywords: entrepreneurship; free-lance activity; industrial revolution; music composition; patronage;

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    Cited by:
    1. Borowiecki, Karol Jan, 2013. "Geographic clustering and productivity: An instrumental variable approach for classical composers," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 94-110.
    2. Andreas Wagener, 2012. "Why Do People (Not) Cough in Concerts? The Economics of Concert Etiquette," ACEI Working Paper Series AWP-05-2012, the Association for Cultural Economics International, revised Dec 2012.

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