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Why Do People (Not) Cough in Concerts? The Economics of Concert Etiquette

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  • Andreas Wagener

    ()
    (School of Economics and Management, University of Hannover)

Abstract

Concert etiquette demands that audiences of classical concerts avoid inept noises such as coughs. Yet, coughing in concerts occurs more frequently than elsewhere, implying a widespread and intentional breach of concert etiquette. Using the toolbox of (behavioral) economics, we study the social costs and benefits of concert etiquette and the motives and implications of individually disobeying such social norms. Both etiquette and its breach arise from the fact that music and its "proper" perception form parts of individual and group identities, convey prestige and status, allow for demarcation and inclusion, produce conformity, and affirm individual and social values.

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File URL: http://www.culturaleconomics.org/awp/AWP-05-2012.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by the Association for Cultural Economics International in its series ACEI Working Paper Series with number AWP-05-2012.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2012
Date of revision: Dec 2012
Handle: RePEc:cue:wpaper:awp-05-2012

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Keywords: Concert etiquette; social norms; music;

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  10. Hillman, Arye L., 2010. "Expressive behavior in economics and politics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 403-418, December.
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Some people go to classical concerts to cough
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2013-01-16 15:28:00

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