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City Silhouette, World Climate

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  • Dascher, Kristof

Abstract

Global emissions of carbon dioxide need to fall lest climate change will accelerate. Any effective climate policy must raise the price of carbon consumption. From an urban perspective, one desirable effect of a carbon tax would be to induce households to move closer to where they work. This paper shows that: If the initial distribution of commuting distances (the city silhouette) is skewed towards the periphery then a carbon tax will leave resident landlords better off - even if these landlords need to shoulder those extra commuting costs themselves, too. If resident landlords are decisive then this insight provides an urban silhouette based explanation of why some governments appear so much more willing to confront their citizens with the true cost of emitting carbon dioxide than others. More briefly, the paper suggests a connection between urban form and climate politics.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 48375.

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Date of creation: 15 Jul 2013
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:48375

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Keywords: Urban Silhouette; Climate Policy; Political Economy; Carbon Tax;

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  1. Wheaton, William C., 1974. "A comparative static analysis of urban spatial structure," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 223-237, October.
  2. GAIGNE, Carl & RIOU, Stéphane & THISSE, Jacques-François, 2012. "Are compact cities environmentally friendly?," CORE Discussion Papers 2012019, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  3. Schelling, Thomas C, 1992. "Some Economics of Global Warming," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 1-14, March.
  4. Glaeser, Edward L. & Kahn, Matthew E., 2010. "The greenness of cities: Carbon dioxide emissions and urban development," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 404-418, May.
  5. Desmet, Klaus & Rossi-Hansberg, Esteban, 2012. "On the Spatial Economic Impact of Global Warming," CEPR Discussion Papers 9220, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Millard-Ball, Adam, 2012. "Do city climate plans reduce emissions?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 289-311.
  7. Larson, William & Liu, Feng & Yezer, Anthony, 2012. "Energy footprint of the city: Effects of urban land use and transportation policies," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 147-159.
  8. Rainald Borck & Matthias Wrede, 2004. "Political Economy of Commuting Subsidies," CESifo Working Paper Series 1339, CESifo Group Munich.
  9. Herbert Mohring, 1961. "Land Values and the Measurement of Highway Benefits," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 69, pages 236.
  10. Rainald Borck & Matthias Wrede, 2007. "Commuting Subsidies with two Transport Modes," CESifo Working Paper Series 1972, CESifo Group Munich.
  11. Richard S. J. Tol, 2009. "The Economic Effects of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 23(2), pages 29-51, Spring.
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Cited by:
  1. Rainald Borck, 2014. "Will Skyscrapers Save the Planet? Building Height Limits and Urban Greenhouse Gas Emissions," CESifo Working Paper Series 4773, CESifo Group Munich.

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