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Does sending farmers back to school have an impact? a spatial econometric approach

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  • Satoshi Yamazaki

    ()

  • Budy P. Resosudarmo

    ()

Abstract

The Farmer Field School (FFS) is an intensive training program providing farmers with science based knowledge and practices, including integrated pest management (IPM). Recently there has been intensive debate as to whether or not this kind of training has any significant impact. Most case studies argue that the impact, in terms of a farmer’s ability to reduce the use or pesticides while increasing yields, is significant. However, studies conducted by Feder et al., using a household panel data set for Indonesia, could not confirm that this is the case. This paper utilizes Feder et al.’s data set and applies a modified model specification and a spatial econometric technique to re-evaluate whether or not the FFS induces better performances among farmers enrolled in the program and also among their neighbors, who are expected to receive some spillover knowledge from the FFS alumna.

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File URL: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/acde/publications/publish/papers/wp2007/wp-econ-2007-03.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics in its series Departmental Working Papers with number 2007-03.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pas:papers:2007-03

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Keywords: agricultural economics; spatial econometrics; economic development;

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  1. Godtland, Erin & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & de Janvry, Alain & Murgai, Rinku & Ortiz, Oscar, 2003. "The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt8hp835xx, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
  2. Anselin, Luc, 2002. "Under the hood : Issues in the specification and interpretation of spatial regression models," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 27(3), pages 247-267, November.
  3. Tripp, Robert & Wijeratne, Mahinda & Piyadasa, V. Hiroshini, 2005. "What should we expect from farmer field schools? A Sri Lanka case study," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1705-1720, October.
  4. Praneetvatakul, Suwanna & Waibel, Hermann, 2006. "Impact Assessment of Farmer Field School Using A Multi-Period Panel Data Model," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25499, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  5. Case, Anne C, 1991. "Spatial Patterns in Household Demand," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(4), pages 953-65, July.
  6. Gershon Feder & Rinku Murgai & Jaime B. Quizon, 2004. "The Acquisition and Diffusion of Knowledge: The Case of Pest Management Training in Farmer Field Schools, Indonesia," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 221-243.
  7. Feder, Gershon & Murgai, Rinku & Quizon, Jaime B., 2003. "Sending farmers back to school - the impact of farmer field schools in Indonesia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3022, The World Bank.
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Cited by:
  1. Davis, Kristin & Nkonya, Ephraim & Kato, Edward & Mekonnen, Daniel Ayalew & Odendo, Martins & Miiro, Richard & Nkuba, Jackson, 2010. "Impact of farmer field schools on agricultural productivity and poverty in East Africa," IFPRI discussion papers 992, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. ERREYGERS, Guido & FEREDE, Tadele, 2009. "The end of subsistence farming: Growth dynamics and investments in human and environmental capital in rural Ethiopia," Working Papers 2009008, University of Antwerp, Faculty of Applied Economics.
  3. Dalton, Timothy J. & Lilja, Nina K. & Johnson, Nancy & Howeler, Reinhardt, 2011. "Farmer Participatory Research and Soil Conservation in Southeast Asian Cassava Systems," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2176-2186.

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