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Teacher Sorting, Teacher Quality, and Student Composition: Evidence from Norway

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Author Info

  • Hans Bonesrønning

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Torberg Falch

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Bjarne Strøm

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

Abstract

Using panel data for Norwegian schools, we establish a two-equation supply and demand model for teachers with approved education. Taking into account nationally determined teacher pay and a strict teacher appointment rule, the data enable us to separately estimate supply and demand functions for certified teachers. The results clearly indicate that the student body composition, and in particular students belonging to ethnic minorities, influences both teacher supply and teacher demand. The implied negative relationship between excess demand for certified teachers and the share of minority students is likely to be important for teacher quality.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology in its series Working Paper Series with number 3403.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 01 Apr 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:3403

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Web page: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/iso/WP/wp.htm
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Keywords: Teacher sorting; Teacher quality; School choice;

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  16. Dale Ballou & Michael Podgursky, 1998. "Teacher recruitment and retention in public and private schools," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 393-417.
  17. Helen F Ladd & Edward B Fiske, 2001. "The uneven playing field of school choice: Evidence from new zealand," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(1), pages 43-64.
  18. Falch, Torberg & Rattso, Jorn, 1999. "Local public choice of school spending: disaggregating the demand function for educational services," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 361-373, June.
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Cited by:
  1. S Bradley & C Green & G Leeves, 2006. "The role of pecuniary and non-pecuniary factors in teacher turnover and mobility decisions," Working Papers 579097, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.

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