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The role of pecuniary and non-pecuniary factors in teacher turnover and mobility decisions

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  • S Bradley
  • C Green
  • G Leeves

Abstract

We investigate the determinants of teacher exits from and mobility within the Queensland state school system. In common with previous research we find that non-pecuniary factors, such as class size and location, affect movement decisions but our results suggest a significant role for pecuniary factors. In particular, higher wages reduce exits from the public sector, especially in the case of more experienced female teachers. Locality allowances paid to teachers in rural and remote schools, where non-pecuniary factors are less attractive, appear to have some success in attracting and retaining staff in these locations.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department in its series Working Papers with number 579097.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:579097

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  1. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 2001. "Why Public Schools Lose Teachers," NBER Working Papers 8599, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Harris, Douglas N. & Adams, Scott J., 2007. "Understanding the level and causes of teacher turnover: A comparison with other professions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 325-337, June.
  3. Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2002. "An Analysis of Occupational Change and Departure from the Labor Force: Evidence of the Reasons that Teachers Leave," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(1), pages 192-216.
  4. Eric A. Hanushek, 2003. "The Failure of Input-Based Schooling Policies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages F64-F98, February.
  5. Stinebrickner, Todd R., 1998. "An Empirical Investigation of Teacher Attrition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 127-136, April.
  6. Hans Bonesrønning & Torberg Falch & Bjarne Strøm, 2003. "Teacher Sorting, Teacher Quality, and Student Composition: Evidence from Norway," Working Paper Series 3403, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  7. Brewer, Dominic J, 1996. "Career Paths and Quit Decisions: Evidence from Teaching," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(2), pages 313-39, April.
  8. M. J. Andrews & S. Bradley & D. Stott, 2002. "Matching the Demand for and Supply of Training in the School-to-Work Transition," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(478), pages C201-C219, March.
  9. Falch, Torberg & Strom, Bjarne, 2005. "Contents continuedTeacher turnover and non-pecuniary factors," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 758-758, July.
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