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Career Paths and Quit Decisions: Evidence from Teaching

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  • Brewer, Dominic J
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    Abstract

    Conventional models predict that workers consider employment opportunities and monetary rewards expected over their lifetimes when making current period decisions such as whether to quit a job. This article tests the hypothesis that later career opportunities affect quit decisions by examining the relationship between teaching and school administration. Evidence on the extent to which administrative positions are available to teachers, and the salary premia associated with them, is presented. Discrete time logit-hazard models of teacher quits, estimated using data from New York State, provide some support for the hypothesis, though the magnitudes of the estimated effects are small. Copyright 1996 by University of Chicago Press.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

    Volume (Year): 14 (1996)
    Issue (Month): 2 (April)
    Pages: 313-39

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    Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:14:y:1996:i:2:p:313-39

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    Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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    Cited by:
    1. Scafidi Benjamin & Sjoquist David L. & Stinebrickner Todd R., 2006. "Do Teachers Really Leave for Higher Paying Jobs in Alternative Occupations?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-44, December.
    2. Feng, Li, 2005. "Hire Today, Gone Tomorrow: The Determinants of Attrition among Public School Teachers," MPRA Paper 589, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 1999. "Do Higher Salaries Buy Better Teachers?," NBER Working Papers 7082, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Donald Boyd & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2003. "Analyzing the Determinants of the Matching Public School Teachers to Jobs: Estimating Compensating Differentials in Imperfect Labor Markets," NBER Working Papers 9878, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. McIntosh, Steven & Arnaud Chevalier & Peter Dolton, 2003. "Recruiting and Retaining Teachers in the UK: An Analysis of Graduate Occupation Choice from the 1960s to the 1990s," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 151, Royal Economic Society.
    6. Alejandro Ganimian & Mariana Alfonso & Ana Santiago, 2013. "Calling Their Bluff: Expressed and Revealed Preferences of Top College Graduates Entering Teaching in Argentina," IDB Publications 82302, Inter-American Development Bank.
    7. Imazeki, Jennifer, 2005. "Teacher salaries and teacher attrition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 431-449, August.
    8. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price, 2004. "To Teach or not to Teach? Panel Data Evidence on the Quitting Decision," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 916, The University of Melbourne.
    9. Jonah E. Rockoff, 2008. "Does Mentoring Reduce Turnover and Improve Skills of New Employees? Evidence from Teachers in New York City," NBER Working Papers 13868, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Gates, Susan M. & Ringel, Jeanne S. & Santibanez, Lucrecia & Guarino, Cassandra & Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie & Brown, Abigail, 2006. "Mobility and turnover among school principals," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 289-302, June.
    11. S Bradley & C Green & G Leeves, 2006. "The role of pecuniary and non-pecuniary factors in teacher turnover and mobility decisions," Working Papers 579097, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    12. Jaime Saavedra-Chanduví & Hugo Díaz, 2000. "La carrera de maestros: Factores institucionales, incentivos económicos y desempeño," Research Department Publications 3109, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    13. Torberg Falch & Bjarne Strøm, 2003. "Teacher Turnover and Non-Pecuniary Factors," Working Paper Series 3604, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

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