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How will baby boomer retirements affect teacher labor markets?

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  • Daniel Aaronson
  • Katherine Meckel

Abstract

The authors estimate teacher demand and supply through 2020 to gauge the impact of baby boomer retirements on the demand for new teachers. They find that the projected demand will accelerate through at least 2020, and a good portion of this increase will be due to retirements. Still, this demand, once it has been adjusted for the size of the potential work force, will not be considerably different from that of the past five decades.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago in its journal Economic Perspectives.

Volume (Year): (2009)
Issue (Month): Q IV ()
Pages: 2-15

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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:2009:i:qiv:p:2-15:n:v.33no.4

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Related research

Keywords: Retirement ; Labor market;

References

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  1. Daniel Aaronson & Lisa Barrow & William Sander, 2007. "Teachers and Student Achievement in the Chicago Public High Schools," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 95-135.
  2. Podgursky, Michael & Monroe, Ryan & Watson, Donald, 2004. "The academic quality of public school teachers: an analysis of entry and exit behavior," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 507-518, October.
  3. Daniel Aaronson & Daniel Sullivan, 2001. "Growth in worker quality," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 53-74.
  4. Steven G. Rivkin & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain, 2005. "Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 417-458, 03.
  5. Richard J. Murnane & Randall J. Olsen, 1990. "The Effects of Salaries and Opportunity Costs on Length of Stay in Teaching: Evidence from North Carolina," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(1), pages 106-124.
  6. Jan Ondrich & Emily Pas & John Yinger, 2008. "The Determinants of Teacher Attrition in Upstate New York," Public Finance Review, , vol. 36(1), pages 112-144, January.
  7. Eric A. Hanushek & EJohn F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 2004. "Why Public Schools Lose Teachers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
  8. Charles T. Clotfelter & Elizabeth J. Glennie & Helen F. Ladd & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2008. "Teacher Bonuses and Teacher Retention in Low-Performing Schools," Public Finance Review, , vol. 36(1), pages 63-87, January.
  9. Benjamin Scafidi & David L. Sjoquist & Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2005. "Do Teachers Really Leave for Higher Paying Jobs in Alternative Occupations?," University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity Working Papers 20055, University of Western Ontario, CIBC Centre for Human Capital and Productivity.
  10. Sean P. Corcoran & William N. Evans & Robert M. Schwab, 2004. "Women, the labor market, and the declining relative quality of teachers," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(3), pages 449-470.
  11. Dolton, Peter J & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 1995. "Leaving Teaching in the UK: A Duration Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(429), pages 431-44, March.
  12. Harris, Douglas N. & Adams, Scott J., 2007. "Understanding the level and causes of teacher turnover: A comparison with other professions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 325-337, June.
  13. Donald Boyd & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2005. "The draw of home: How teachers' preferences for proximity disadvantage urban schools," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 113-132.
  14. Stinebrickner, Todd R., 1998. "An Empirical Investigation of Teacher Attrition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 127-136, April.
  15. Jonah E. Rockoff, 2004. "The Impact of Individual Teachers on Student Achievement: Evidence from Panel Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 247-252, May.
  16. Peter Dolton & Wilbert van der Klaauw, 1999. "The Turnover of Teachers: A Competing Risks Explanation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(3), pages 543-550, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Robert G. Valletta & K. Jody Hoff & Jane S. Lopus, 2012. "Lost in translation? teacher training and outcomes in high school economics classes," Working Paper Series 2012-03, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  2. Valletta, Robert G. & Hoff, K. Jody & Lopus, Jane S., 2012. "Lost in Translation? Teacher Training and Outcomes in High School Economics Classes," IZA Discussion Papers 6402, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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