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Media Bias

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  • Sendhil Mullainathan
  • Andrei Shleifer

Abstract

There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9295.

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Date of creation: Oct 2002
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9295

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  1. Stealing Wheelbarrows
    by Liam Delaney in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2010-09-18 16:24:00
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